CDC Re-Opens Door for Public Comment on Opioid Prescribing Guideline Amid Scrutiny and Criticism

CDC Re-Opens Door for Public Comment on Opioid Prescribing Guideline Amid Scrutiny and Criticism

Under mounting criticism from patients, physicians and industry, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced it has opened a second period for public comment on its Guidelines for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain, the agency made public in a notice in the Federal Register.

CDC’s draft guidelines will be available on Monday, December 14, 2015, at http://www.Regulations.gov for review and comment. The public comment period opens December 14, 2015 and closes January 13, 2016.

When the CDC first presented its draft guidelines in a webinar, but not through publication on its website or through other communications vehicles, the agency allowed only two days for public comment.  That drew a lot of scrutiny.

The CDC was widely criticized for developing the guidelines in secrecy, prompting the Washington Legal Foundation to threaten a law suit, charging that “state governments and the medical community are unlikely to accept any guidelines tainted by charges that they were prepared in secret without meaningful stakeholder input and with the assistance of individuals who have serious conflicts of interest,” the group wrote in a letter to Dr. Tom Frieden, Director for CDC and Dr. Debra Houry, Director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.

Reaction from pain patients and industry has been deafening, with many arguing that the guidelines will further push pain practitioners out of practice, while simultaneously limiting access to opioids for people who need them.

“The fact of the matter is that state & federal law should not decide how my pain is treated. A licensed medical professional who specializes in pain should have the say in my pain management,” commented one reader of National Pain Report.

“All of us are working to establish a new standard of chronic pain care – one that allows healthcare professionals and those living with chronic pain access to the full menu of treatment options, including opioids for those who benefit from them,” said Myra J. Christopher in an email from PAINS Project.

Here are instructions on how to comment, according to the Federal Register:

You may submit comments, identified by Docket No. CDC-2015-0112, by any of the following methods:

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Attn: Docket CDC-2015-0112

4770 Buford Highway N.E., Mailstop F-63,

Atlanta, GA, 30341

All submissions received must include the agency name and Docket Number. All relevant comments received will be posted without change to http://regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. For access to the docket to read background documents or comments received, go to

http://www.regulations.gov.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Arlene I. Greenspan, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

4770 Buford Highway

N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA, 30341;

Telephone: 770-488-4696.

CDC will also convene the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control’s Board of Scientific Counselors to review the draft guidelines.

A public conference will be held January 7, 2016, at 9:00 am on a conference call (Dial-In Number: 1-888-395-7561, Participant Code: 3954121).

The conference call will focus on the background for development of the CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain (Guideline) and the formation of the Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain Workgroup (Opioid Guideline Workgroup).

Public comments will be accepted, but only related to the formation of the Opioid Guideline Workgroup.  There will be 30 minutes allotted for public comments at the end of the session. All public comments will be limited to two-minutes per speaker.

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Authored by: Staff

There are 41 comments for this article
  1. James Broome at 10:33 pm

    Samantha Lynn
    It sounds like you have crps or RSD

    I do and if where not for lyrica and pain meds I don’t know what I would do I am glad I have a doc that will help me and not treat me like a criminal.

  2. Nita at 9:38 pm

    Why is it that the Sickle Cell Community did not hear about any of this prior to the finalized guidelines???

    Why is Sickle Cell NOT considered a “Health Disparity”???

  3. Scott michaels at 7:33 pm

    samantha lynn
    i glad that someone young like you weaned off pain meds when they didnt work. most peoe think its automatic that you are an addict. most people arent. only those with the gene of addiciton. you dont have it. please sent your story to the cdc maybe theyll read it and see. that anybody can take opioids as long as they take as directed for the purpose of pain relief and not a recreational high

  4. Samantha Lynn at 2:58 pm

    Hello, my name is Samantha Lynn. For a year, I have been trying to find a treatment to control my leg. My grandfather prays each night for my leg to be cured. My leg has been jumping, numb, tingling with a severe burning pain that feels like a hot fire poker and my bones sometimes grind against each other. I also have to wear socks to bed or else my feet get so cold, I can’t stand it.

    The pain began on April 25, 2014 before I graduated from high school two months later. I was walking around the track that day during gym class when my leg began to swell as severe pain radiated down my right leg, forcing me to stop. I had to limp back to my class with someone’s help as I dragged my leg behind me.

    That weekend my grandfather and my aunt took me to the hospital where the doctors said that I twisted my leg and wrapped it in an ace bandage. But that night, the pain grew worse. I then went to my primary doctor who told me I sprained my leg and it would feel better. It didn’t. It slowly grew worse. In June, I was getting ready for the day when my leg went numb from my knee down to my toes. I have not been able to feel my right lower leg since then.

    I have now seen 9 different specialists at different hospitals – Sinai, etc., and no one can find out what is wrong with me. I am only 22. I was planning to move to PA but my leg has held me back.

    My doctor sees me every four weeks for my chronic leg pain. She is worried and never saw a case of chronic pain of this multitude before. I have been on several pain meds and taken off due to them not giving me relief. I’ve been on a new pain med for a while now and a muscle relaxer too. I hope the Botox I’ll be getting in July this year will help. I was born with Factor IV Ledien, a blood disorder, Restless Leg Syndrome, and mild Cerebral Palsy which caused my lower legs to be slighly deformed.

    The symptoms I had at 10 are now back to haunt me: the tingling, grinding bones, numbness, fire poker pain, and barely able to walk. In the year of 2003, I went to my mother, complaining of all the symptoms I mentioned above. She took me to a kids’ hospital in DE where the doctors did all sorts of tests. They told my mom I had arthritis. I always had minor leg problems at school but never like this…until the day in April when my issues returned. Could it be arthritis, an familiar “friend”?

    To cope, I swim weekly in a heated pool at the Merrit Athletic Club. The warm water minimizes the pain but once I get out, the pain comes back. Since I love to swim, I had aqautic therapy twice which failed. All other tests were negative for the following: sciatica, scoilosis, and neuropathy.

    I relate very much so to you and what you’re going through. I dread going to sleep at night because I never know if this 22-yr old lady is gonna sleep all night or wake up. I get these random attacks of pain down my leg at night and during the day at the best of times. I can only feel the inside of my leg. As soon as the sun sets, the pain in my leg goes from 400°-900°. Lately every time my foot tingles, it’s as if I stuck it in an electric socket along with my stil grinding bones and ice cold leg. When these attacks do occur, I know nothing but pure agony until it stops.

    Why do doctors think, I, along with many other people with chronic pain, assume we just want painkillers to get high? It is very sad that they think that, so they leave us to suffer in pain. My primary doctor I can’t say that about. She is geniune unlike these other doctors I saw for my leg who literally kicked me to the curb, saying to me, “I don’t know how to treat you.”

    While I am not a resident of the UK., I have chosen to add my voice with other chronic pain sufferers, in a desperate plea to the CDC to continue to allow those with chronic pain to recieve painkillers when needed. We, chronic pain sufferers are not drug-seekers, looking to get high; we are seeking for a way to ease our unbearable pain.

  5. Kathy Koch at 4:35 pm

    All I want is help every once in awhile with my severe pain without putting me on a guilt trip. After 50 years if I haven’t become addicted to opioids I think they should be available to me once a month or so.

  6. j at 10:27 pm

    Everyone needs to comment on Cdc site. Only 1200 signatures so far.

  7. diane martin at 12:31 am

    My daughter has Rsd/Complex Regional Pain Syndrome and the pain meds at least make it bearable to function. She also has headaches for 10 yrs now. Flew all over the country to headache centers and hospitalized to try to break the cycle with IV infusions which did not work. Still has them 24/7 The Crpsis uunbearable. It’s called the suicide disease. No cure for it other than trying ketamine infusions for the rest of your life. This will just lowerthe pain level for maybe 3 months then back again for infusions. CRPSis the highest pain on the McGillscale. She does not abuse her meds. It should be left up to the pain management doctors to make the decision about opiates.

  8. cocoaimee at 10:02 pm

    I had a pretty good life up until about ten years ago. I awoke with what any woman would have thought was a bladder infection and I called my doctor to get an antibiotic called in and of course he obliged and I started in it immediately but instead of feeling better I became much much worse. As days went on I became violently ill. THe Pain was horrific. A plus 10 every day. My Dr ordered scans for kidney stones and all kinds of other tests because he was so confused by the antobiotic not working. He sent me to a urologist after 4 weeks of this and after some testing I left her office with the worse diagnosis of my life. I had a disease called intersistial cystitis (IC) for short and I was end stage IC. This disease is ranked as in the top ten most painful diseases and as I learned it really is. I went on to try every treatment offered over these past ten years and if I was not in pain management I would not be here to be writing you about it because most of the treatments are pretty barbaric and involve catheters and injecting solutions that burn you more than you all ready are. Part of my daily medicine routine since the beginning has been daily bladder injections and what they are is everyday I take a catheter and take 3 different meds a numbing agent a steroid and a blood thinner and inject it into my bladder hoping to ease the symptoms and I do this daily and it must be done in a very sterile environment. IC is basically a deficient bladder wall we lack a bladder lining and everything we eat and drink burns us, so we really can’t eat much of anything without horrible pain and we only can drink water and in my case I could only drink distilled water from my local health food store. If this disease does not break you from the pain then it breaks you with diet restrictions and dr visits, so we must take very good care of ourselves and take all medicines as prescribed. I have never felt a high from my medicine my medicine just takes the edge off my pain so I can be a mom just long enough in one day. Iam white knuckling life. I am very sad that so many of us are going to suffer due to the bad choices of so few. I am also so sad that the drug abusers are so unaware of what they have. They are throwing it all away. They have the greatest gift of all. They have their healthy life I would give anything to have that back. I pray for them every night that they can get clean. These drugs are the worst thing to ever have to need, but they are a godsend when you need them. Without them I would not have a HS graduated son in his first year of college and a daughter in her junior year of HS and none of it been easy for them with a sick mom. Plus my son did it with Touretts syndrome so we all have excuses to give up and turn to abusing drugs we must choose not to. I have since had to have a urostomy and I have a bag on the outside that I drain, so I have lost the use of my bladder to IC but I still have my bladder because with IC we will get phantom pain if we remove it which it turns out Iam getting anyways so I may go onto remove it next year. My treatments right now are pain medicines. Iam still injecting lidocaine, heparin, and kenalog daily into my bladder to try and keep it numb but the cocktail is not working. I take many other meds also as IC causes so many other conditions because it destroys the body one organ at a time. I have lost my large intestine, so now lots of digestive issues. I have had a hysterectomy and that was botched so lots of extra nerve pain there. But it’s not my DRs fault so I would never blame him. I have wonderful DRs that have tried to help me through this very hard disease.

  9. Pam Carrey at 8:01 pm

    I have had pain for many years, ever since I had double knee replacement surgery. I do NEED pain meds, and I am not over-prescribing or abusing them. They help me tolerate the pain that would be diffuclt to endure without them. My sister has RSD/CRPS, a chronic pain syndrome. She is not an abuser of pain meds. She requires them to life a decent life.

  10. Rebecca Gelineau at 1:09 pm

    B L I am wondering the same why more chronic pain patients are not voicing their opinion? Granted the holidays? No I’m in pain and not enjoying!
    °°°Does anyone know of a social media link I can post that is not so patients? Post on Facebook.
    Here in Massachusetts very few know about it?

  11. BL at 3:39 pm

    There are plenty of people voicing their comments that are In Favor of these Guidelines. It has been almost 14 days and as of Dec 26, less than 1,000 have commented. No sure how many of those are Against and how many are In Favor.

  12. Dorian W at 7:34 pm

    to ANNONOMYS
    your wrong. everything you mentioned is addictive
    TO AN ADDICT! go to an AA OR NA MEETING AND ASK WHAT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN ADDICT AND A PERSON DEPENDENT. PSYCHODELLICS AND MUCSLE RELAXERS ALTER YOUR MIND AND
    YOU GET LOADED. OPIOID TOLERANT PEOPLE THAT TAKE THEIR MEDS AS DIRECTED DO NOT GET WASTED. THERE ARE 25 MILLION OF US. WE CAN TAKE OUR MEDS AND FUNCTON,, NOBODY CAN FUNCTIO. ON A PSYCHODELLIC.
    YOU WROTE A VERY UNEDUCATED COMMENT.
    READ ALL THE COMMENTS BEFORE U give out bad info..PLEASE!

  13. Scott michaels at 7:26 pm

    AS WELL AS BRINGING FLYERS TO PAIN DOCTORS OFFICE, I SUGGEST WRITTING LETTERS TO THE 2 TOP.CANDIDATES EXPLAINING.OUR PLIGHT.
    IF NOT THEY, ESPECIALLY DEMOCRATES WILL.JUST JUMP ON BOARD WITH WHATEVER CDC SAYS.
    THEY WONT HEAR OUR STORIES.

  14. Rebecca Gelineau at 2:38 pm

    Scott Michael, yes I do indeed plan on telling my story, of chronic pain.
    As I stated in a comment I can only hope that millions of other pain patients who suffer chronically that they will actively participate and voice their opinions on what the CDC proposed guidelines may have on the quality of their lives.
    I am still torn however as to send an email, address or comment on the site.
    The reality of stigma and a small town of course my name is already out there on this site.

    In the past few days I have advocated to others who are leading at times- an uncontrolled pain level , unsatisfying life.
    They are surprised to find the proposed may actually affect them!? .
    I have led them to the proper sight to read and
    Lend my support to them if they need help. navigating to an elderly person it is intimidating..

    The CDC is grouping chronic pain patients into one… not separate human beings. I explained to others.. even if they have different disease processes, so surprised is not an appropriate word.

    Any suggestion?
    Has anyone else encountered this lack of knowlege? Especially in our elderly population…

  15. Anonymous at 10:46 am

    Opioids: Extremely harmful, extremely addictive, prescriptible, no whatsoever healthy appliance.

    Cannabinoids: Harmless, non-addictive, multi and economical usage, anti-carcinogenic, barely researched (recent study enlarged knowledge generally on our Immunity System from CBD’s).

    Psychedelics: Harmless, non-addictive, natural anti-depressant, IF RESEARCHED it may revolutionize Psychology, also, barely researched. Tagged as Highly Dangerous and Illegal.

    Not much to say to be honest.

  16. Scott michaels at 5:31 pm

    i hope ur tell your story to the cdc.
    this is what they need to read

  17. Rebecca Gelineau at 2:08 pm

    It is so hard to become not angry. Chronic pain as everyone is aware is a direct result of a disease or a condition. I agree 100%… when you write your letter, just don’t use only anger to get medication. For most chronic into pain medication but take it to control their pain. I hope everyone takes the time even 5~10 minutes to oppose.
    I have to ask in reading the article, why do you think it is better email then on the Federal Register? It seems it would be less intimidating to patients, to see that others have step forward?

  18. Rebecca Gelineau at 1:23 pm

    I posted a quick story of my life . I do agree.. to bitter does not help. It seems most pain patients feel the same. Not enough time for patients to express a life of pain. Everything was done behind closed doors. Thank God there are the kind hardworking pain foundations, who I personally – owe a great deal of thanks and praise.. I cannot imagine if this goes through, as if there is not enough death with overdoses, there will surely be with suicide! I find it very hard to believe that all of these overdoses are directly related with every single pain patient. I just came across an article of different generations Baby Boomers Gen X, there is a great deal to be learned on the age of most pain patients. I can only hope that this has been studied as well. I sincerely hope that every pain patient that life matters – will take 2 minutes to write their story…

  19. Rebecca Gelineau at 12:56 pm

    I was born healthy, I went to school, I grew up. I loved my life! I worked. I got married, a house of my own, a great career, I loved my life! I fell off of a ladder putting up Christmas decorations in 1999 I was hurt but I had a happy time at Christmas? I loved my life. I was on my way to work a job I had so many options a great career with advancement. A car ran a stop sign and hit me near head on April 2000 I took a day off from work to recoup, I still love my life. I attacked my injuries with a vengeance, PT chiropractor, massage therapy cranial sacral manipulations, injections. I was a little discouraged by life but I was determined I would once again love my life. August 2001 still treating for injuries, I started getting pain not only in the places hurt from the ladder neck back rotator cuff an accident but in my small joints. A diagnosis with a Rheumatologist confirmed RA. I was very discouraged by life, but once again I would love life. More treatments, more physical therapy, different medications, a great job, a mostly satisfactory life. I still worked, I was still very active, I was in the prime of my life thirties a great time to enjoy! I still loved my painful life. The surgeons would not agree with the rheumatologist, so again begins the cycle more treatments. I have a fantastic primary care doctor who has stood behind me and encouraged me through this time. I love my life. The year 2006 was probably the most discouraging. I could no longer work the job I loved career I had worked hard for and looked forward to advancement. I resigned to disability. I added a psychologist to my treatment team for the depression of chronic pain tries to rob you of loving your life. I wanted to love my life. Fast forward to 2010 I am still active, I still have a house, I am young I am vibrant I will conquer my neck of an 85 year old. The pains that wake me in the night. I get up and I stretch, I walk sometimes harder than I should, with my doctors encouragement I became an intensive foster care parent a challenging position. But if I was to be disabled I would not let this Rob me. Pain or not? I love my life. Foster parenting became a stress trigger which caused increased pain. I was forced to take a break my last foster child at a tender age of 8 beat me nearly to surgery. I still love him he suffered same as me, so his was a mental pain mine was physical. Pain never leaves you shoulder the weight, and you still love life. 2015 I no longer work, I am active active as able able, I may walk a little harder than I should but I will remain active. I’m still in treatment I receive injections every two weeks, and any other type of treatment I can find. The rheumatologist and the surgeons still don’t agree. I still have the same encouraging primary care doctor I am discouraged many days, but I am meant to be here. I am Alive, I love my life. I intend to continue to live my life. I will go for my injections next week to relieve some pain, I’ll go for a walk so shorter it might be. I will accept help if I need it, I will offer my mind to a lonely person if they need it, I will smile I will laugh I will cry, but I will live my life. I love my life. To the families, to parents who have lost their your precious , I will listen, for Iam compassionate and I sympathize with you. I can’t imagine your grief carrier carrier but I am a pain patient and I love my life. To the CDC the lawmakers politicians and anti pain medication, this is a mirror into my life of pain, I have left out most of my frustrations, tears or pity. In such a short story of my life of pain. I I’m grateful and fortunate my entire life was not in pain. CDC read my story and listen I have repeated I love my life, I did not ask for these accidents to happen. I take pain medicine to live my life. During this time I have lived my life without pain medication… it is these times I refer to that I did not ask for your mercy or pity. I do ask of you however, do not judge every person on a pain medication and the doctors who have worked so mercilessly for so many hours for those in pain. I ask you to consider not to group everyone in the same category. There are many people like me who would like to continue to live life, the way we choose to love life. Do not force me into hideous pain without medication, for I am a person, a human being who may but I take the good with the bad, I am honest I am a worker, I would not ask you to step a day in my life, let me Dr do his job and let me contine to do all I described. Just let me remain as active as I can carry on to live and love my life.

  20. Kara Lang at 2:53 am

    The chronic back pain I’ve dealt with for years now, is not something that can be handled with anything less than opiates. Doctors that I’ve seen have tried to help but are usually at a loss for direction, mainly from fear of state and federal consequences. Due to all of the strict laws in place on opiates and chronic pain, I’ve needed to ask for something stronger but I haven’t from anxiety and fear of being cut off as a regular patient. It’s a shame that as the patient you get viewed as a drug-seeker, abuser, and countless other negative associations. The doctor’s can try to help, but if they actually listen and help too many people with their pain, they’ll most likely be reprimanded for doing so. I’d love to have a solution of some kind to handle these problems for those of us that actually do suffer constantly with real pain. When you don’t want to take narcotics, but have to in order to function or have some sort of life it makes it really difficult always worried if it’s going to be cut off and you’ll be put through withdrawals for no reason other than others misconception of the drug and its affects.

  21. Tarah at 10:55 am

    I have had RA and Lupus since I was 9 years old….why do I get treated like scum if I want to be pain free? Why is it so hard? I no longer can call my doctor and get meds I need…I have to drive 2+ hours to my doctors sit for hours then another 2 hours to get one1 1 #1 only 1 of many is an 2hr wait? I pretty much have to tell a stranger everutime I need my script filled my person health history every time!! I don’t look sick…I don’t look like a drug addict…I am a normal woman who is going to blow her brains out BC the pain is so bad…yet I know what I need…I KNOW WHAT I NEED!!! I’ve been in this body for 38 years I know it pretty well!! Having to go through what we do just to keep from being in pain is ridiculous… Its a joke…lift all laws…let US WE THE PEOPLE…to decide how we deal with pain!!! Stay out of our pursuit of happiness…all I want is to be pain free…never go through w/d BC my doctor is too busy or out…we are just making certain ones rich while we suffer… Find a way I beg!

  22. dave rosen at 8:47 am

    what, only 65 xomments.
    they.lied with stats, used numbers that were for deaths that are bogus. the enitre report s filled with lies.
    they say max dose 90 mg morphene eq for all. why that #. it wont create.addicts. Addiction is a genetic desease. if only .0001% of the scripts written in a population where people over 65 QUADRIPPLED sincw 2008. we actually use less opioids today then in 2008 by percentage of aging
    YOU PEOPLE NEED TO WRITE SEVERAL COMMENTS EACH USING NAMES OF PEOPLE YOU KNOW THAT WOULD SUPPORT YOU. IM SORRY WE MUAT FIGHT FIRE WITH FIRE. IF THEY DONT GET AT LEAST 10,000 COMMENTS THEY WILL IGNLRE US AS THEY HAVE.

  23. Scott michaels at 8:38 am

    CDC HAS OPENED COMMENTS FOR TBOSE OF US THAT DISAGREE WITH THEM.
    SINCE YESTERDAY ONLY 65 DOMMENTS MADW IT THROUGH.
    IN THE FINE PRINT THEY SAY INAPPROPRIATE LANGUAGE OR UNFOUNDED CLAIMS WILL BE VOID OR REDACTED.
    THIS IS THE TIME YOU MUST WRITE A LETTER AS IF YOU ARE WRITTING TO YOU ENGLISH TEACHER. TAKE TIME, DONT USE RUN ON SENTENCES, PROOF READ TWICE AND NO PROFANITY.
    MAKE SURE YOU TELL YOU FRIENDS FAMILY DOCTORS AND ANY PAIN PATIENTS. IF YOU CAN GET OUT, GO TO YOUR PAIN DOCTORS OFFIce and hand out flyers withe the link and inf needed. 65 COMMENTS IS A JOKE PEOPLE. IF YOU WANT YOUR MEDS TAKEN AWAY BE LAZY, DO NOTHING AND THEY WIN. YOU MUST.GET YOUR BUTTS ACTIVE.
    1 TAKE 3 80 MG OXYCONTIN AND 6 15 MG MORPHENE (bt pain) A DAY FOR MY PAIN. BASICALLY THEY WANT ME TO COMPLETELY STOP THE OXY. if i can only take the 6 morphene a day IM GOING TO BE IN BED IN PAIN THE REST OF MY LIFE. NO PLAYING.WOTH GRANKIDS, NO HELPING.WIFE AROUND THE HOUSE, NO DRIVING, NEEDING HELP TO DRESS AND FEED MYSELF. WITH OUT THE MEDS I.CAM.NOT LIFT.MY HEAD MORE.THEN 1 INCH WITHOUT SCREAMING AT THE TOP OF MY LUNGS. PLEASE HELP ME AND HELP YOURSELVES..

  24. wendy Hart at 12:35 pm

    I wish that these studies would simply study how those of us who have been affected by chronic pain for many years, and who have tried alternate forms of pain relief are doing w/our opiates. I am sick of being thrown if w/teenage drug abusers who have swiped Mom’s meds, or the street drug user or all the other folks who are not using their meds as intended. I don’t share my meds. I don’t sell them for extra cash. Nor do I use them to get high and escape my everyday life. I take my meds because they are the only thing that helps bring my pain down to a liveable level where I can be a productive member of society and useful to myself and family. I am tired of pharmacists telling me that they don’t have my meds because they don’t believe I need them in the amounts my MD prescribed. I hate that I can’t get the pills that work for me, like Soma, because others have abused them. I hate that my doctor is afraid of losing his license for prescribing me my meds and I am angry that the insurance company is pricing these meds out of my ability to pay by raising them from a tier 2 to a tier 4.

  25. Scott michaels at 10:38 pm

    every body and all you know that care about you must write in.
    not only to the cdc as indicated.in this article. but to prop and anybody that is against our cause. i suggest writting your.story and forwarding it to anybody.that should read.it. especially in those state that opioid therapy is already denied.
    same letter 20 copies. 1st cdc then fda then prop then us health services your congressman senators, VA ADMINISTRATION. any doctors that are against.us. have your pain doctor write letters also
    and tell them.to have all their patients do the same. we need tbousands of letters not a few.hinderd. WE NEED A CHRISTMAS MIRACLE! AGAIN I K OW WERE ALL BUSY BUT WE MUST MUST MUST DO THIS WORK. USE EMAIL AND PAPERMAIL. DONT BE CHEAP WITH THE STAMPS. MY GOAL IS 150 LETTERS. WHO CAN BEAT ME!

  26. Nicolle Hartman at 9:44 pm

    It’s like gun control, Pit Bulls gone vicious, and opiates abused. It’s about the way the person handles it, not the gun, the dog, the pain killer. A Dr. Should have enough sense (and be simply trained if not) to be able to determine if someone is truly in pain or if the are an opiate addicted seeker! Chronic pain is not a joke and these people are apparently clueless to the cause and effect if a person who’s quality of life, to put it mildly, is affected when the necessary med school are taken away or made near impossible to get from physician. Of course someone with this condition will be forced to get the drugs from the street if this law takes place. This will cause so any more problems, what the hell are they thinking? If they need to appease someone then use the technology we have to do so. Simply prescribe 1 a month at the directed dose, no refills, no exceptions. Track that the patient see only one Dr. And if an addict gets in that mix, they will have to work very hard to obtain enough and will hopefully be noticed s n d provided the help they need
    It’s been said several times bur it’s absolutely true. It’s not okay to group addicts, and chronic pain sufferers, and the CPS, should not have to pay for an addicts disease. They are equally painful and miserable, but the and duct can recover. The chronic pain sufferer in almost all cases cant. And I completely agree that the addict is getting euphoria, the chronic pain sufferers are getting pain relief and a chance st lufe.

  27. Kurt W.G. Matthies at 4:11 pm

    Everyone affected by these guidelines, both patients and prescribers, should comment.

    To comment, you need a Docket Number, which as of today is:

    CDC-2015-0112

    This may change — look to NationalPainReport.com for further information.

    Again, there are 2 ways to submit a comment.

    1. Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov.

    There is nothing yet up on this website regarding the CDC (afternoon of Saturday Dec. 12, 2015).

    Sometime Monday, December 14th, the guidelines are expected to become public, and we’ll check the feedback portal.

    When this material becomes available, National Pain Report will post that information on NPR.

    2. The second way to comment is via US Mail to:

    National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    4770 Buford Highway N.E.
    Mailstop F-63
    Atlanta, GA, 30341,
    Attn: Docket CDC-2015-0112.

    ——————–

    Helpful information for commenting….

    Take your time with this. You have until January13, 2016 (one month) to submit your comment, but don’t wait until the last minute.

    Write out your comment using a word processor. Do not compose your comment on the website. You’ll want to keep a copy of your comment.

    When you’re happy with your comment, you’ll be able to cut and paste to the online site, or upload the WP document (preferable).

    Note the date and time your comment was submitted.

    Save your comments for a rainy day.

    We’ll have more information here as it becomes available.

    This would be a good time to get hooked up with a Twitter account and follow @NatPainReport nd to search the keywords #chronicpain, #NatPainReport, and whatever develops over the CDC Guidelines.

    Facebook accounts can comment at the NPR Facebook site. Even I’m getting on Facebook for this one.

    Time to stand up and be counted folks.

  28. Linda Frost at 3:27 pm

    I have been using hydrocodone for two years following a serious neck injury. I have had three surguries and am left with upper arm paralysis. I seek treatment from a reputable pain management doctor. Your current guidelines will seriously impeed doctors in the management of chronic pain in patients like myself. I always take my meds as prescribed….if i didn’t my pain would not be managed at the end of the month. Addiction is a disease. Consider helping doctors identify the addict as opposed to chronic pain patients. I am in a chronic pain group for support. Many in this group are seriously considering suicide if their pain is unmanaged. They simply cannot go on living in the pain unmanaged by meds. I find this frightening….especially if it can be prevented. Please consider us when you decide to impose guidelines.

  29. Kristen Ogden at 2:07 pm

    One thing is for sure. They certainly may not change the guidelines if none of us speak up and send in our comments. This is an important chance for us to influence what they’re doing and help bring about good change. Please don’t fail to take advantage of this opportunity!!

  30. Anonymous at 11:25 am

    They need to suffer with chronic pain for a year at least before making such decisions… It’s bull**** to allow people to suffer because a handful of people choose to abuse it.
    You’ll end up pushing people away and onto the streets.
    They’ll end up using heroine to help pain.
    If it was offered to me, I wouldn’t decline.
    I have debilitating chronic pain and it isn’t being treated at all thanks to them.
    Maybe I’ll get lucky and die soon… I don’t see them helping **** anyways, they’re too busy judging those in pain.

  31. Scott michaels at 8:52 am

    is this it?. the guidelines should not even be published until all voices of pain are heard. i am in chronic pain, non cancerous. kaiser will “voluntarily” take me down 90% of my meds. i have been on the meds for 7 years 3 from kaiser. those of us that have taken our meds as directed will be hurt. this is just a pacification to patronize us. they wont change a thing once the guidines are published. the argument isnt just that our voices we not heard its that the meetings were done in secrecy without any representation of doctors or patients that prove opioid therapy works for most of us. where are the advocates.and lawyers. this should not be allowed. the entire meeting needs to be done over. the guidelines that will be published are only views of people that had addicts as relatives that died, president of rehab company, insurance companies and kaiser they stand to gain the most. i see the commercials now. “since the govt took away your pain medication we can help you” blah blah. only 20k a month. phoenix house has a 3% success rate by the way.
    they are only allowing 30 minutes of comment on the conference call. ok who gets to speak? why only 30 minutes? they took taxpayer money and spent weeks to put this illegal guidline together. also what about the GESTAPO FDA WILL THEY STILL BE ALLOWED TO FRIGHTEN AND THREAT OUR DOCTORS AND PHARMACISTS. THIS JUST SOUNDS LIKE A HOA (homeowners association) meeting that was held in secrecy. then they allow the community speak for 20 minutes. then they thank you and do what they want anyway. please stop them from publishing this report before the comment session and once the comment session is complete we need to just drop thos issue for at least 3 years. The have been so many policies put in place and atats show the illegal side of this has gone way down. abusers hhave moved on to heroin because its cheaper and pure. Addiction is a desease. CHRONIC PAIN IS A CONDITION. opoioid therapy offersillions of us a quality of life we.thought we would never have again. please dont put me back in bed as an invalid human being.

  32. Barbara Hinen at 7:14 am

    This is great news. I just wonder if they will really listen to those of us who suffer on a daily basis. I am one that lives with chronic pain on a daily basis. Some good days some bad ones. On those real bad days, it would be nice to actually have some meds to help ease the pain. And yes, i have tens unit, several massage units, and heating and cooling devices to help. But sometimes thsts just not enough. I know there are so many others besides myself that honestly need these meds. We are not abusers or addicts. We are people with chronic, Long term diseases that just want some relief. Is that too much for the government to see?

  33. Andrea Minson at 7:01 am

    I have suffered from chronic migraines for over 11 years. This isn’t an occassional migraine, this is a migraine that has never left for over 11 plus years. It varies in intensity throughout the day and with weather changes, altitude changes, stress, etc. I have spent thousands of dollars on Botox for migraine injected into the back of my head every 3 months to help keep the intensity of the pain down. I don’t seek constant euphoria, I seek a better quality of life. I have tried every migraine prevention medication since the migraines first started about once a month back in the 80’s. They have become worse over time since a car accident and a head injury. The medication prescribed for pain and nausea helps decrease the pain level, along with the Botox from a usual 8-9 to 3. A 3 is tolerable. It’s just a low level headache to anyone else. Tylenol and other over the counter meds only cause more pain and nausea. Remember, these migraines never, ever go all the way away.

  34. Kristen Ogden at 6:58 am

    The CDC’s announcement of a 2nd comment period concerning its opioid prescribing guidelines is great news for all pain patients and patient advocates. I do not believe this would be taking place if we had not taken time to speak up loudly about the flawed draft released in September, the 2-day comment period, and the overall lack of transparency and inclusion in CDC’s approach. The public will now have the opportunity for full participation in the process, which is what should have happened in the first place.

    I urge all pain patients and advocates to take advantage of this opportunity to provide thorough, thoughtful comments about the critical importance of opioid medications as the treatment of last resort for many intractable pain patients. It is very important to read and follow the instructions carefully. Be sure to click on the pdf for the Federal Register Notice – this is the official notice published by CDC and this is where you will find the detailed instructions on how to submit your comments. The beginning of this notice reads as follows: DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    [Docket No. CDC–2015–0112]
    Proposed 2016 Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain
    AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health
    and Human Services (HHS).
    ACTION: Notice with comment period.

    The Agency name and the docket number are found in this opening language as shown above.

    I also note that the 30-minute comment period to be held at the conclusion of the January 7, 2016 public conference call is said to be for a very specific purpose:

    “We will be accepting public comments only related to the formation of the Opioid Guideline Workgroup. There will be 30 minutes allotted for public comments at the end of the session. All public comments will be limited to two-minutes per speaker.”

    Michael Hause, it appears pretty clear that this will not be the right venue for you to tell your story. The oral comments at the end of the meeting will only address the formation of the stated workgroup. Your story is extremely important, but you will need to tell it in writing and submit it during the comment period.

    Please don’t be intimidated by the instructions. It isn’t that hard if you just take your time and carefully review them. If you need help, there will be lots of advocates working on this and I’m sure you will be able to get the help and clarification you need. This process may seem a little complicated, but it ensures the opportunity for us, the chronic pain community, to be involved. Many of us wrote to the FDA back in 2013 when it was considering PROP’s petition to limit the use of opioids. FDA heard from many professional medical organizations, many advocacy groups, and many individual pain patients. In that case, the public responded and FDA’s decision reflected all of that input. FDA declined to impose dose and duration restrictions on opioid prescribing, because scientific evidence did not support doing so. Public participation can and does make a difference.

    Our government doesn’t work if the people don’t participate. This is a huge opportunity! Please share this opportunity with everyone you know who has an interest. This is our time to speak and be heard!!!

  35. Theresa shively at 5:44 am

    As someone who suffers from chronic migraines it pisses me off about the regulations the government is trying to enforce if it wasn’t for me taking Hydrocodiene I would probably take my life because of all the pain I’m in now it’s hard for me to get any opiode for my headaches and I’m at my wits end something needs to be done NOW so my doctor can prescribe me my pain medication again.

  36. Kerry at 4:29 am

    My friends, if indeed you wish to begin to change the god-awful patterns of injustice towards we who suffer, this is an excellent step on that path. Flood their system with emails and information, albeit kind and respectful but valid for their discussions and decision making. Tell your friends. Share this story with as many pain sufferers as you can. It is tempting to just let em have it with both barrels, so to speak, but know that our words will be better heard when we give them the facts and the pleas from our hearts. Lets do this!!!

  37. michael hause at 10:43 pm

    To writer of article…
    please be more specific.
    when commenting it asks to use agency name and docket #.
    i see the docket #. what is the agency.
    also who determines the 15 people that get to comment for 2 minutes. on the conference call and how will they be determined.
    someone pleae contact me so i can speak my peace on how opioid therapy has given me a better quality of life and how we should not be grouped with addicts. Addiction is a seperate desease and chornic pain is a condition. one seeks euphoria the other pain relief. if these guidelines go thru not only will americans suffer, good doctors will go out of business and we will see a increase in the suidide and heroin use rate.
    EVERYBODY MUST UNDERSTAND THIS IS OUR ONLY SHOT TO BE HEARD. WRITE LETTERS AND EMAILS during the open comment dates.
    FOLLOW THEIR DIFFICULT DIRECTIONS, IF HELP IS NEEDED LET ME OR SOMEONE YOU TRUST KNOW WHATS UP AND YOU NEED HELP. IF YOU DONT CONTRIBUTE BY TELLING YOUR STORIES AND HOW THESE GUIDELINES WILL AFFECT YOU, YOU CANT COMPLAIN. ESPECIALLY THOSE OF YOU THAT ALREADY LOST YOUR MEDICATION. HERE IS MY ONLY worry. IF YOU ARE JUST AN ADDICT USING THIS FORUM TO GET DRUGS STAY OUT OF IT
    YOUR OPINIONS ARE NOT NEEDED. ONLY SERIOUS CHRONIC PAIN PATIENTS THAT STAND A CHANCE OF LOOSING THEIR OPIOID PAIN THERAPY OR ALREADY LOST IT, COMMENT. PLEASE NO RAMBLING, TO THE POINT AND PROOF READ.THANk YOU!!!

  38. Carla Cheshire at 8:27 pm

    This is an excellent opportunity. I urge all of the Chronic Pain Patients to take part in voicing our thoughts on access to opioid treatment, efficacy and the impact of their policies.

  39. John Vineyard at 7:32 pm

    This is great, whether they will take our input in to consideration is another story, but just to allow our comments is a major milestone. Thank you Washington Legal Foundation.