Chronic Pain Task Force on Opioids and What Happens Now

Chronic Pain Task Force on Opioids and What Happens Now

“50 million people have chronic pain—20 million of those have high impact chronic pain—and there is an absolute need as a medical community and larger society to get educated on what the best treatments are.”

That was the task defined by Dr. Vanila Singh, the Chairperson of the Pain Management Inter-Agency Task Force.

In part one of our recent interview with Dr. Singh, she emphasized the input the Task Force received as over 9000 comments including pain patients, pain professional groups, nursing organizations and pharmacists opined.

“The commentary helped make the case of how alarming this situation is,” she said. “The comments had an effect on us and the report we wrote.”

(Here’s a link to the final report)

Dr. Vanila Singh

On the issue of opioids, we asked Dr. Singh about how the opioid controversy is often perceived as binary: opioids are either good (giving chronic pain patients and others palliative relief) or bad (they are highly addictive and are a public health crisis).

She pointed out that federal agencies have begun to course correct noting that the CDC Guideline for Opioid Prescribing was misinterpreted—which the agency acknowledged– and that the FDA and, notably, the American Medical Association both stated the need for a balance in prescribing.

“Those changes began the process of change by addressing the misinterpretation and misapplication,” she said. “The Task Force is helping bring the issue to light.”

Not everyone agrees. Richard Lawhern Ph.D., who manages the Alliance for Treatment of Intractable Pain, congratulates the Task Force on its work, but thinks it doesn’t address the urgency of the opioid crisis

“The HHS Task Force on Pain Management did a tremendous amount of work, some of it highly constructive. But no group which includes such a cross section of professionally self-interested practitioners and Federal Agency representatives can completely avoid politics. I can only imagine the arguments that occurred between Task Force members in private,” Lawhern told the National Pain Report.

Lawhern added, “The Task Force flinched from calling for outright withdrawal of the 2016 CDC guidelines — a truly fundamental error. As long as this fatally flawed document continues to exist, it will be used by Federal and State drug enforcement authorities as an excuse to continue forcing doctors out of practice who dare to prescribe opioids to people in agony.”

Dr. Singh reminded us that the Task Force is an advisory panel that doesn’t have rule make authority. But the report itself—and its emphasis on how to treat chronic pain—may be poised to make a difference.

“The federal agencies have been waiting for this report and are now reviewing it, “she said. “It’s important the people have spoken.”

Dr. Singh, an anesthesiologist who has treated chronic pain patients, uses her Twitter feeds to make the case for better care of pain patients, saying this week “Stigma is a major barrier to the treatment of pain. Education and awareness at multiple levels is key to solving this problem.”

What happens now with the Task Force Report on Pain is that people—the right people (policy makers and elected officials in Washington D.C. and decision makers in state capitals) need to read the report and begin a serious discussion about how we can treat pain better—and do it better quickly.

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Authored by: Ed Coghlan

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For those following this thread:

On Sunday June 23, at about 4:30 PM Eastern Time, I will interview with award-winning radio journalist Roy Green, on his show syndicated across Canada. I have talked with him on the air several times previously. If experience is a guide, our interview may last 10 to 15 minutes. This time we may take as our theme, “There Ought to Be A Law”.

Several US medical associations and academies explicitly repudiated the science, logic, and conclusions of the US CDC opioid guidelines of 2016. So-called “clarification” of those guidelines in April 2019 was too little and too late. The guidelines must be retracted for a rewrite by an agency that actually knows what it is doing. And along with that retraction must come mandated changes in opioid regulation policy throughout US healthcare and law enforcement agencies, including retraction of the Veterans Health Administration “Opioid Safety Initiative” and direction on DEA to stand down from persecuting doctors.

Incidental to the interview, I hope to mention my published work demonstrating that there is no relationship between prescribing of opioid pain relievers by doctors, versus opioid-related overdose deaths from all sources. “Over Prescribing” is a mythology, not a fact, and the entire public policy narrative on addiction and chronic pain treatment needs to change to reflect reality.

There is a “listen to the show” link from Roy Green’s page on the Global News Network, as well as a listing of Canadian radio stations which carry the program.

https://globalnews.ca/national/program/the-roy-green-show

Regards,

Why can’t the head of CDC and FDA simply have a joint press conference and honestly say that they made a huge mistake and that pain patients are needlessly suffering and doctors are needlessly fearful of treating pain patients as responsible human beings like any other patient?
This is a critical issue NOW. Doctors and nurse practitioners are so paranoid that people are leaving the operating room and going home in agony. This has got to stop. We have turned into a third world country that does not help pain since they don’t have the medicines. We do have the medicines and are not using them appropriately. More resources are needed to treat true drug addiction that mixes illegally gotten opiods with other street drugs and they are the ones who need addiction help; and they needed it long before the “opiod crisis” was suddenly upon us. People were dying of overdoses long before the media and politicians hyped it up.
Put the medicine right, and put the help right to the right people….and stop mixing everything up and causing more harm than good.

Get the CDC out of the pain med discussions. And the Task Force doesn’t have the right to tell a “doctor” what to do. Unless you suffer 24-7, don’t say a word They have no.idea what we go through!! Too many ppl, the wrong ppl have become involved in the medical decisions of America. What happened to HIPPA?

Terry Ott

Bottom line first. When anyone in a position of authority regarding pain medications declares that “opioids are not effective for treatment of chronic pain”, I will counter that vigorously, vociferously, and with unswerving confidence and resolve. Moreover, if there is any doubt that chronic pain can take a life via suicide, there should NOT be. The rest of this is very personal.

My wife of 50 years died last month. A glorious life of achievement in academia, molecular genetic research, counseling, and exceptional parenting and grandparenting ended. Metaplastic breast cancer, then spreading to her lungs, was the official cause of death. But excruciating intractible pain had taken her life away over the past decade. Suicide had become her “master plan” for escaping the pain produced by a disorder of the central nervous system. We had tried everything.

She refused chemotherapy for the cancer because she couldn’t even imagine the misery that its side effects might bring to her pain-plagued body. And, she said that even if chemo were somewhat effective in forestalling death, the best it could do would be to return her to her unrelentingly painful “non-life”: lack of sleep, fatigue 24/7, reduced appetite, difficulty concentrating, limited social contact, trouble walking or even standing or sitting (as in a car) for an extended time, and so on.

Over her last years, a compassionate pain management MD, while trying all the alternatives, continued prescribing opioids. In various forms and dosages they made it possible for her to keep facing life. They didn’t completely alleviate pain, but they always knocked it down a bit for a 1-3 hour interval — with no apparent side effects. The “noise” about an opioid crack-down was a source of great anxiety and depression. That potentiality seemed to trigger suicidal ideation re: “if and when” she were denied the only pain medications that worked at all.

It’s sad that cancer finally ended her pain. But it did.

Rich Reifsnyder

Hi, Study after Study,Survey after Survey and seeing that sadomasochists Kolondys pictures and fictitious rants and the government dragging their feet for over 3 years is Enough! We have contracts,urinalysis,pill counts,legal Documentation proving Our a Disabilities and this isn’t enough for these pack of sadomasochists,greedy,corrupt politicians.If dosages were increased to a normal level,.I would be willing to sign a legal document that if I died from taking my Opiod Pain Medication my family or relations could not Sue the Pain Specialist,Pharmacy or anyone over my death! This government wouldn’t go along with that idea,they would rather torture us letting us suffer and die from complications related to severe pain.I would sign in a minute to have my Quality of Life back,but that would be to easy and prove them wrong with 0 OD Deaths from prescription Opiod Medication taken responsibly for decades with no problems till PROP stepped in the game to peddle Suboxon.Opiod Medication has been used since 7 th Century China,its cheap, effective and very very safe if taken responsibly like millions of us do.We need to Vote every single one out along with the form letters they send on Abortion And Addiction.This is 3 long years with their little Study on Opiods,all these politicians know it’s Fentanyl And Heroin and Fentynal Laced Pills,And they just ignore us and turn their backs on us and keep the lies and rants going blaming us disabled people!

Tina Block

Whats wrong with this whole scenario is that this is not a ONE SIZE FITS ALL problem. I am sure that or rather I hope that we as pain patients would get to be able to keep our pain meds because we NEED THEM for PAIN.The CDC needs to leave the Doctoring for the Doctors and let the Doctors TREAT their patients. This problem has been around for ages because we have dishonest people in the world and with that there is going to be a fare amount of illegal distribution.Being a pain patient for years I have realized that I am only but one person who is Absolutely dumb founded at how this mess got to be so big. I hope that in the future we as pain patients can again get our meds back to where they were at a therapeutic level. I have seen on more than 1 occasion how this illegal problem is falling on our shoulders because of what others are abusing. Why is it that we as pain patients have to lose our Quality of life due to other peoples problems.We as children in grade school were taught that we were all the same but in reality we are not. I just wish that the CDC would realize that and let the Doctors be Doctors.I really hope that in the near future that I and many others like me get to get back to living.

Mark

Pain management is the only medical specialty where a patient can be receiving successful palliative treatment, with little or no adverse effects, only to have it either cut in half or ended all together. I thought successful treatment was the goal of medicine. I was wrong and I have worked as a health professial before being disabled. It’s not right!

Gail Honadle

Take a good look at Congress, they get their DRUGS hand Delivered to their DC offices. Are you aware some of take Dementia and Alzheimer’s drugs? MAYBE WE SHOULD DEMAND TO SEE THEIR PHYSICALS AND MED LIST LIKE THE PRESIDENT HAS TO DO. THOSE one Dementia and Alzheimer drugs NEED TO BE FORCED TO RETIRE IMMEDIATELY.
https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/old-school-pharmacy-hand-delivers-drugs-congress-little-known-perk-powerful

“At first it’s cool, and then you realize, I’m filling some drugs that are for some pretty serious health problems as well. And these are the people that are running the country,” Kim said, listing treatments for conditions like diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

“It makes you kind of sit back and say, ‘Wow, they’re making the highest laws of the land and they might not even remember what happened yesterday.’”

Gail Honadle

My 2 cents: CDC, you had the new Director Robert Redfield whose own son OD’d and survived on Heroin/Fen laced, then you had Andrew Kolodny a Addiction Shrink who owned Phoenix House Rehab centers which were in financial trouble. Redfield Declared War on PAIN Patients out of Revenge, as we are Soft Targets we use doctors, insurance, pharmacies. We were forced into Pain Clinics because of Bad greed driven doctors. Which don’t work well for Intractable Pain Patients or Chronically Ill who can barely get about with wheelchairs, or are bed ridden. Kolodny like Redfield have NO experience in the field of PAIN, Redfield is a Virologist. Both were recommended by a Bitter Loser in the Presidential race while he still had some ‘cred’ as a politician as former Governor of N.J. Chris Christie, BOTH men LIED 1 for Revenge, other for Greed to fuel his failing Rehab Clinics. Then they blamed the current President. Well it didn’t start there, it went back further. Obama administration gradual to reply early alarms about fentanyl: report https://infosurhoy.com/…/obama-administration-gradual…/ CATO CDC Researchers State Overdose Death Rates From Prescription Opioids Are Inaccurately High https://www.cato.org/…/cdc-researchers-state-overdose… further than one would think. I’m old enough to remember that the CIA ran both guns and Black Tar Heroin out of Laos during Vietnam. They are still running it out of the M. E. for Regime change..lesser of 2 evils there. Then you add in trade treaties that brought in Illicit Drugs easier. NAFTA was the prime mover of Illicit drugs into the USA from Mexico. Cartels took over and told farmers what to grow and how to ship them into the USA, that besides the private shipping via vehicles.There was a Constant parade of Babies born Addicted, dead College students with crying parents. BUT NO ONE FROM OUR SIDE WAS ALLOWED IN. 1 Sided representation.
Language was perverted, when you say Opioids the vast majority of people don’t difference.

Dru Williams

As much work as the task force has done, I agree with Red Lawhern! Unless the 2016 guidlines are thrown out, they will always be there and will continue to haunt pain patients and any Dr is is willing to take a chance to begin prescribing pain medications above the 90mme. There is no protection for our Drs from the DEA invading their office, loosing their license, then thrown in prison. They need to release those who are already in prison for treating pain patients with appropriate medication. No, I don’t believe our Drs will never come back to practicing pain management, as long as they are protected to do so. FIRST DO NO HARM, an oath Drs say, the CDC, DEA and all who participated in the harm that has come to Drs and their patients, live by another standard.

dave

Tedious discussions and contemptible compromises from our government and providers has not and will not make pain care much different or better. It is clear that government and experts are milking the disastrous policies and practices in pain care for all their worth with new research and never ending meetings and discussions. Their moral midgetry is on display as is their incapaciousness to serve people in pain or society well. And this is why i have said fundamental changes are necessary to our pain care system.
In the late 1960’s calls were made for giving people in pain a new bundle of rights. We need to have these rights to take away the needy and greedy self serving demands of our government, insurers, providers, etc. they have exploited and oppressed people in pain with pain contracts ever increasing co pays and less and less accessibility and greater inhumanity of pain care.
Its a bad 1950s science fiction flick made real. The selfishness, carelessness, disempathy of our system is egregious.
Americans need to wake up and see the unholy monsters who run pain care for what they are and demand that they reform their morals and practices or go practice in some other country.

Stacie Wagner

I have read through the posts put up by my brothers and sisters in intractable chronic pain. I am gutted by the hopeless sorrow. If anyone needs to talk please message me gr8mom1331@gmail.com
I care, I hear you and I understand you. I am dealing with all of the same feelings of uselessness, hopelessness and terror. Fear of the pain and fear of what the future still has in store. Please take care of yourselves.

Rhonda DiStefano

This is the most crucial absurd situation since Hitler!! Soo many people’s lives are being affected terribly!! I personally am a Veteran and was honored to be one. But to have soo many people suffer and commit suicide over not being treated properly is totally inexcusable!!

Cindy McCalester

This is truly a geniside of a whole community things are really bad out here in the real world.People are really suffering.No guidelines from anywhere is going to stop the suffering and destruction caused by CDC guidelines. NOTHING WILL CHANGE UNTIL DEA STOPS RAIDING DRS OFFICES LYING ABOUT WHAT THEY DO. PRESACUTING DRS HAS TO STOP.
The relationship between dr and patient is forever scarred. In my own opinion I will never trust any dr again. I will die at home I will never set foot in an emergency dept.

Wanda Powell

I need pain meds. I know how bad I hurt and it’s not fair that they can be taken from people like me that need them and has never had a problem with them. Bet these law makers and judgemental people can get what they need. It’s just [edit] the ones that overdose are overdosing. That’s their life not mine. Stupid people do stupid things. Give me a chance to prove myself.

Jeanette French

After the guidelines were put out there, warning letters were sent to doctors who prescribed over this limit, so how can anyone say it was only a guideline, it was meant to be a law, and it was enforced as law, and many people took their lives over it. Warning letters were also sent to pharmacies as well, I have seen these letters and they do exist so please do not tell me that lie, that it was meant to be a voluntary guideline. You have forever done irreparable damage to pain patients and just as much as we will never trust another doctor, doctors will never trust you again. Tell me how you plan to fix that ?

Glenda

I went to my Pain Mamagement Clinic today and found he was explaining and spending too much time with patients so the hospital and he came to an agreement and he’s no longer there can you believe that this Dr was my lifesaver he is the Dr that perfected Nerve Burning and pain meds he spend too much time with his patients he invented the nerve burnings around fusions I am so mad what am I going to do now

Hayden Hamby Jr.

I’m holding my breath and not expecting my 80 percent reduction of medication taken for 23 years WITHOUT an increase in dosage to be restored however, Nothing is ever achieved by taking BS from dot/gov or any other situation. I’m keeping hope……alive.

Holly

I know one thing…I am about at the end of my rope. I was cut back AGAIN this past Monday ….Damn it! WHY WHY WHY??? I have a failing spine, I’ve had 6 reconstructive surgeries on my common bile duct due to an incompetent Surgeon, 1/2 of my live removed due to the failed recontructive surgeries, adhesions from being cut open in the same place 7 times. I have awful pain when I pee or when I CAN pee, 1 failed neck surgery and one failed spine surgery I have been compliant, passed every urine test! I am getting worse but my meds keep getting cut. I hurt so friggin bad, I’ve been crying since Mon. What do I do? Who do I turn to? I am lost! NOONE cares!

Now Fox News is saying half of people who have prescription opiates drink alcohol. How do they know ? How did they get that information unless they have privy to your medical records? This is a bunch of crap because I have never drink alcohol nor do I smoke. And now I’m not on any pain medication . Why do they want to continue to Black the eyes of intractable pain people. Like the old song says dirty little secrets, dirty little lies got their fingers in everybody’s pies they all love dirty laundry.. Medias just needs to go sell crazy somewhere else I’m all full up here. Yes this is as good as it gets for intractable pain patients. The selling of Hope has been going on since 2015. Just an endless loop.

Rebecca Hollingsworth

Everyone is so cynical, but absolutely correct. Unfortunately Washington never does anything quickly. If you are in this, then prepare to be in it for the long haul. I just experienced my worst month ever having my meds cut by 80% since February. Pretty much bedridden and considering what other options I have. Do what you can and keep fighting! Pray! Maybe we will get a miracle. We sure could use it.

WarOnPainPts

I’m being tapered against my will and against the will of my doctor despite years of stable, productive living on high dose opioids. I showed him the HHS Task Force document and he laughed. “Ok, no abrupt tapering hahahahaha!” Yes, that’s how I feel about this report, too. HHS had the opportunity to save people’s lives, many lives, and they failed. People living with pain will continue to suffer and die.
CDC guidlines are not science based and their suggestions are harmful, bad medicine.
I was disgusted with the CDC and PROP. Thanks to HHS Task Force I no longer have any hope.

Molly K Canfield

My doctor at a big, teaching hospital near Atlanta shook his head while grimly stating, “Chronic opioid therapy…” as if he was remarking “bubonic plague.
Sent me home in tears after I’d sobbed my way through ketamine infusion (for treatment resistant depression). He knows that I am having surgery in a few days for my chronic plantar fasciitis. You know, I agree with our original post, we’re screwed forever. I don’t believe we’re going to be heard, taken seriously and “guidelines” will be reversed. Someone who used to be very close to me and works at the CDC refused to even acknowledge the tragic consequences of their actions. Living with chronic pain is not “living” ; it’s existing.

Jeffery Fischer

This is all horrible if they felt the pain I felt every day, They would change their mind. I hurt so bad right now I’m going crazy.

Chris

Now that the CDC guideline has been clarified by the experts failure of physicians to follow the new guidelines should be considered abusive behavior.

Kimberly

My husband has 4 herniated discs one that touches his sciatic nerve his doctor just recently cut him from 30 mg oxycodone to 7.5 norco and then gave him suboxone told him to take that for the pain he is in a tremendous amount of pain the doctor doesn’t care he said this month that if he wanted to complain to call his insurance company they are the one regulating the medications which he knew was a lie because I also have degenerate disk disease and 6 black discs 3 herniated discs up top and 3 on the bottom I still take 30 mg oxycodone however I did get cut to 2 a day but that’s a big difference between them cutting me 1 pill a day to completely cutting his meds down to something that doesn’t touch his pain we are now searching for my husband a new doctor I just pray we find one quick he is starting to get depressed and I’m scared he will do something rash

Cindy

When I couldn’t get thru by phone to my pain manager last week, I sent a fax, and I’m thinking that the detail of that fax helped me get a fast and positive response. Like most doctors in FL, they dont’ have a good record about calling back.

My fax detailed my agony on the latest med change, which was increased percocet at my request to the pre-forced taper amount, but decreased methadone due to the Guideline. My fax also quoted Dr Singh’s comment about the Task Force and the Guidelines from NPR’s newsletter last week and mentioned the recent CDC and FDA statements..

I got an emergency appt the next day, and, I got an increase in total MME’s. For a decade, I’ve been on 3 pills daily of methadone per day. That got cut to 2 when he increased my percocet as stated above.

Due to my fax and emergency appt, now I’m on 2.5 pills of methadone per day and the same percocet Rx. Not what I had originally, but it’s a move in the right direction.

Until he cut the meth, I never realized how much it did. I really thought that I could deal with a decrease in the meth as long as I had my original percocet dose again. But I couldn’t live that way.

I’m a bit better with the new dosage, and hoping that in time, will improve on the same dosage.

I’m also a bit more optimistic about the future, given my new Rx’s.

I do know that I can’t go on indefinitely the way I’ve been since the forced taper. I’ve been wondering how long I’ll be able to remain in my condo since I barely do even my own grocery shopping any more. Without my former BF who still helps me, I’d be in an ALF now — and my LTC insurance and money are not enough forever. I’m only 62 now.

I doubt that anyone has LTC insurance which covers more than several years. The super rich don’t need it at all, and buying decades worth of LTC would be insanely expensive.

Aside from wondering if I can remain out of a facility, I also frequently ponder how long I can last this way without killing myself.

Reece

As someone said, “ the horse is already out of the barn”. PainManagement doctors have already closed their doors . Pharmacists are in control. Recently a Pharmacists at Wallgreens refused to fill my prescription.She stated. “Doctors can write a prescription, but I am the one in CONTROL of filling it”. It is about that feeling of power and drugstores don’t make money filling pain medication. I was told that by one of the few Honest pharmacists.

yusuf

Hello on may 29 I was in such severe pain from”crps” degenerative disc.. not including I am a amputee .. that I tried to commit SUICIDE I was just tired … I do have a implanted morphine and baclofen pump which is my second one . ONLY difference is the Dr . He will not increase the dosage I have not have had a increase in 2 years .. also he doesn’t write pain medications when you have a pump I am fine with that … On June 13 I saw him to refill my pump I explained to him.. the reason that I had tried to commit SUICIDE was my pain was out of control… Again he did nothing. Only thing he said was good thing you are not on oral pain meds .. to which I said if I was on oral meds I probably wouldn’t try to commit SUICIDE.. thanks for listening Yusuf

T. Negrete

Since the Advisory Committee has no power to make changes, I see the time and energy put into these guidelines as a baby step. I have watched, waited and had a little hope that there would be changes that help. I am a Chronic Pain Patient with intractable pain. Unfortunately, I also have a mental diagnosis and this has made life more difficult with my Intractable Pain. I have had a few Doctors who have seen me as a physical being. For the most part, Doctors have treated me as if everything that presents as illness in my body, is all in my mind. I’m not going into detail about my life and my journey with pain, Doctors, Pain Management Specialist, the Medical Community, it doesn’t matter and would be a futility. I have no hope left!!!

Gary Raymond

“The urgency of the opioid crisis.” The stereotypical ignorance within the government must end. The opioid crisis is caused by illegal recreational use of black market drugs. Ask the CDC director’s son. Remember Michael Jackson and Propofol? How about Prince dying from Fentanyl and Percocet? People suffering from chronic pain are in private and government computer systems so it is easy to follow and persecute us. We should automate the black market and catch the bad guys. Have you noticed the people who are calling the shots have never experienced chronic pain? Caffeine is addictive.

Terry

The one thing that stood out for me in this article was the statement “Washington D.C. and decision makers in state capitals) need to read the report and begin a serious discussion about how we can treat pain better—and do it better quickly,” the keyword being quickly. Let’s say the CDC totally changed their guidelines and doctors could legally prescribe 150 mgs morphine equivalent, do you really think doctors would increase prescriptions for chronic pain patients? I think they would be too paranoid to prescribe anything over the current morphine equivalents, I mean why take a chance on losing your medical license? I think chronic pain patients are screwed forever, and that’s a real travesty. If the CDC changed the guidelines, they would have to put language in there that doctors need to increase pain meds to 80% of previous levels or something similar, you get what I’m saying. That’s my take on changing the CDC guidelines. Chronic pain patients will just have to endure the pain, and I fear it will be forever.

Stacie Wagner

The FDA and CDC need to be brought up on conspiracy to commit murder charges because as long as that report exist they are killing people in chronic pain!
I appreciate the work of this board however I really wish that it had been made clear that “the Task Force is an advisory panel that doesn’t have rule make authority. But the report itself—and its emphasis on how to treat chronic pain—may be poised to make a difference.” And that “The federal agencies have been waiting for this report and are now reviewing it, “ because I really have no faith that they will do the right thing. So if anyone wants to pray please do however I am prayed out, hopeless and angry. I am disgusted by the lack of response from the CDC, FDA, state and local authorities, the DEA and the federal government. The facts are real that people in this community are suffering in ways no one ever should suffer. Doctors are afraid to help for fear of prosecution and legally there is very little hope of a class action law suit to fix this because of the wording of the report. So the recommendations of HHS shouldn’t encourage anyone to believe that help is around the corner because right now 9/11 first responders are still fighting for help 18 years after the fact. The government says that they can’t afford to pay for fund of the very heroes that responded to 9/11 in only 5 seconds, just 5 seconds. Now 18 years later they are still fighting for relief. So if you believe that these same law makers are going to help us I think it’s a delusion. Better to face reality now instead of trying to hope and suffer any longer than necessary. You can however lend your voice to the victims of 9/11 and call your Congress people.
Here is the link to find your representative and you should call about financing the 9/11 victims compensation fund. And of course about repealing, destroying and fixing prescribing guidelines for CPP.

https://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

Debbie Nickels Heck, MD

That’s a good start. It’s the most hopeful sign people in pain who’ve been woefully ignored, Drs forced to change their methods of treatment due to wrongful fear and, MY PERSONAL HATRED OF THE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCE OF THAT WRETCHED DOCUMENT, medical students and residents who’ve been trained to never give patients opioids and patients’ claims of pain “isn’t as bad as they claim” will now be reversed and patients will again be treated without fear by Drs who are educated properly from medical school forward that patients aren’t fabricating their loss of normality of life when in pain and must be returned to normality using opioids properly when necessary.

Geoffrey Nielson

Same cyle different day.
Once the unfathomable moment of trauma occurs, the many moments of pain cycles to be endured and the enforcement of skewed policies prevail, then and only then will the writers, researcers, blue ribbon committee members and elected persons feel, see, taste, touch and smell the stigma of the life as a pain warrior.
I, for one, am warranted to accept this new, old life as best I can.
The moldy contentions and procreations of numerous ‘care teams’, policy makers and policy enforcers pale in my respect of the Universe’s humor. That being: “this is as good as IT gets man.”
Maybe I will come back as a hair folical in the left inner ear of an ass.
As I humbly endure now and in some future areana, lol, may I also attend to the Humor of the Universe.
Geoffrey Nielson