Halloween contact lenses are truly frightening, the FDA says so

Halloween contact lenses are truly frightening, the FDA says so

Halloween contact lenses are truly frightening, the FDA says so

Halloween contact lenses are truly frightening, the FDA says so

With Halloween just days away, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning the public not to use Halloween contact lenses without a prescription.

Unless contacts are fitted properly to a prescription from a qualified eye-care professional, they will almost certainly be a bad fit. And badly-fitting theatrical contact lenses can cause serious eye disorders, including infections, corneal abrasion, corneal ulcers, vision impairment and even blindness.

And if you’re not frightened at the thought of somebody losing their eyesight over a Halloween prank, then you should be.

The FDA is worried, and so are a host of eye care professionals — including the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, the Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists and the American Optometric Association. They are all warning consumers not to use any theatrical or decorative contact lenses, unless they have been properly fitted with a prescription.

These dangerous and unapproved decorative contact lenses are used to temporarily change a person’s eye color or to make their eyes look weird — like giving them a zombie, lizard, vampire or cats-eye look, for example. When an actor uses such lenses for a movie scene, you can guarantee that he or she will only use contact lenses that have been fitted to a prescription, so they fit the curve and shape of that person’s eyeball exactly. Anything less would be a bad idea.

If you or someone you know is absolutely determined to wear theatrical contact lenses of special effects lenses for Halloween, then do it the wise way. Always have your eyes examined first by a registered eye-care professional, and have that eye expert write you out a prescription for the decorative contact lenses you want. The prescription should specify the make and model, and the correct eye fitting for your eyes.

Get the eye-doctor to show you how to put the contacts in safely and take them out again, and how to clean them and maintain strict eye hygiene, so you can avoid any eye infection. And lastly, never ever lend your contacts to anyone else to wear, and never ever borrow any contact lenses from someone else.

Image via Wikipedia