Is Research on the Medical Impact of Marijuana Accelerating?

Is Research on the Medical Impact of Marijuana Accelerating?

By Ed Coghlan

What should make chronic pain patients smile is the news that the federal government is actually allowing more research of the impact that medical cannabis has in chronic illness.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) recently awarded a team of scientific researchers at the University of Florida a $3.2 million grant in order to determine whether the plant medicine will alleviate ailments caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Newsweek reported a story that the National Pain Report has been emphasizing for several years—that the federal drug laws are hampering legitimate research on the medical impact cannabis can have on several chronic illnesses including chronic pain.

Since marijuana is still a Schedule 1 substance, it’s difficult to get clinical studies approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The catch here is that in the absence of enough federally funded research, marijuana proponents lack the grounds for getting the Schedule 1 classification overturned.

The Las Vegas Sun printed a story that indicates many veterans are overwhelmingly in favor of research of the impact medical cannabis has for treating mental or physical conditions. 82% said they wanted cannabis as a federally legal treatment option.

The added negative influence of Attorney General Sessions who continues to proclaim his belief that marijuana should not be legalized—that it leads to worse drug use and crime.

That’s despite the growing public support for the legalization of cannabis, although for it to break through as a serious and universally accepted way to treat chronic pain, it simply will need more serious research results.

The growing cannabis industry is seeing an opportunity in the opioid issue.

It released a survey this past week that claims that 67% of patients stopped using opioid medications after using medical cannabis.

The preliminary study was released by Aclara Research which is a firm that specializes in the cannabis industry and said that the study was with a group of pharmacist professionals active within the cannabis industry.

29 states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana in some form—most of them for medical use.

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Authored by: Ed Coghlan

There are 9 comments for this article
  1. Barbara W at 3:33 pm

    This is wonderful! One thing we have to weigh in on if we can to block the taxation to the growers at 45% which will make it much more expensive

  2. Armin Groesch at 4:07 am

    Not to turn this political,but what in the heck is wrong with Jeff Sessions? I didn’t
    care for either candidate, but voted as most do for what I thought was the lesser of
    two evils, which enabled Sessions appointment.Somebody as stupid and dogmatic
    as he,is unfit for office,fire him and his boss next election.In fact, vote out all these bums on both sides of the aisle,neither party has done diddly for us,impose term limits on all of them. MJ (smoked since 1969 Vietnam) has been a life-saver,keeping my type A, stressed out personality under control.Thank you Mr. Coghlan for your labor,I was a cancer worker for thirty years,many of my patients smoked weed,including a twelve
    year old boy and it helped them immensely.Getting this phony government to move is
    like water dripping on a rock.We need young blood in government,get all these old
    dinosaurs of both partys out .Got to stop, apologize if I offended anyone.As a former
    cancer worker I am heart-broken to see and hear the suffering that some of your
    readers have needlessly endured.

  3. Sergio Ramos at 11:04 pm

    Regarding marijuana as a treatment for PTSD, I can attest to it’s neccessity as a treatment as I too suffer from it. I use marijuana to help me come to terms with what happened to me because of when I was 6 years old and I watched my older brother murder my father right before my very eyes.

    Marijuana has helped me come to terms with my PTSD in 2 important ways. 1, it calmed my senses and allowed me to think clearer. I can understand many things much easier now that I’m not so anxious. And 2, as it kept me calm and collected, it actually brought on a flashback which allowed me to use the aforementioned perk to help me understand what actually happened 28 years ago, to the day, on the 22nd of this month.

    Don’t get me wrong though, forcably re-experience the fear and terror 28 years later is no less terrifying than it was when it happened. Just, being able to have something like that happen in a controlled environment surrounded by loved ones sure makes things a hell of a lot better!

  4. Sergio Ramos at 10:41 pm

    Marijuana Conspiracy # “unknown”

    What if, when marijuana becomes legal federally, over a third of pharmacutical companies start go bankrupt because marijuana naturally heals the underlying causes some of these prescription medications are manufactured to treat and not cure in any way? Hah, how entertaining!

  5. Denise at 1:22 pm

    Come on giving the NIDA 3.2 million to research what? Have we not witnessed enough of can happen when the federal government gets involved. Professor Raphael Mechoulam has 25 years of research on the connection that Marijuana THC and CBD has to a receptor in our brain. not enough has even been said about his discoveries with this plant. I can speak from experience that cannabis indica has not only relieved the pain my fybromyalgia, but has stopped the the pain for weeks, and this only a small amount. I had suffered with this debilitating pain since 1999 when i was diagnosed. I have absolutely no faith or trust in our government. I fail to see what good will come from there involvement, and i for one have had enough of there dictating, and policing our care! have we not suffered enough! I for one plan on fighting back.

  6. JoDawn at 10:11 am

    Well, finally! Some sense out of our government!
    Now let’s see if they follow up on it. This should NOT be a Schedule 1 substance.

  7. Dustin at 9:34 am

    Id like to know the basis schedule 1 in first place? It shouldn’t have been cept for nixon. And whos suffered? This e hole country has been devestated. Thankfully this is slowly changing and the “what about the kids” b s is winding down cept for those stuck in the dark ages. It ought to be deschedeled or rescheduled immediately for lack of facts being its not schedule 1 no matter the rationale.

  8. Maureen Mollico at 8:59 am

    Thank you Ed. This can’t come soon enough! And hopefully before more CP folks end their lives because of no more pain meds. Keep in prayer for this!

  9. Bob Schubring at 5:00 am

    One crucial element that’s often overlooked, is that the DEA relies on “US research” to make decisions on whether substances belong on Schedule I.

    Back in 1973 the US still dominated medical research, so that wasn’t a significant handicap.

    Today Singapore, Japan, China, and several European nations have moved ahead of the US in medical research.

    Over 100 US patents on cannabis-based medicines have been granted to inventors who live in Israel and get funding from Israeli firms and from the State of Israel.

    Now that the US has fallen behind on medical research, it’s dangerous to ignore discoveries made in other countries, when making decisions about how drugs are to be used.

    Curiously, the Food and Drug Administration understands this fact. If foreign research shows that a Pharma drug is dangerous, the FDA immediately takes note of the fact.

    But when foreign research reveals new reasons why cannabis is safe and medically useful, DEA persists in ignoring the news, and insists on waiting for a scientist based in the US, to copy the experiment and prove it.

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