Pain Providers Gather in New Orleans – Are We Doing Anything Right?

Pain Providers Gather in New Orleans – Are We Doing Anything Right?

by Ed Coghlan

The annual meeting of the prestigious Southern Pain Society has an interesting and provocative title this year:

Pain Management–Are We Doing Anything Right?

Geralyn Datz, PhD has served as President of the Society.

“The goal of the meeting is to reflect on the current state of pain treatment and to remind ourselves that we need to take a biopsychosocial approach to chronic pain and include all specialties,” she said.

The conference, which starts in New Orleans on Friday (September 30) and runs through Sunday, will focus on a number of topics important to pain management right now.

What about that title?

“It is actually a tongue in cheek reference to the fact that pain medicine has been under such scrutiny lately and we are not where we need to be in terms of the evidence base for treatment for patients with chronic pain,” she said.

Dr. Datz emphasized the importance of making sure that each pain patient is receiving treatment that is tailored specifically. She acknowledged that the dilemma that pain is the number one public health problem and opioids–which have been used to address chronic pain– cause a number of deaths, as something that must be addressed.

“The answers lie in tailoring treatment to the individuals with pain and optimizing non-medication treatments as much as possible. Our agenda this year focuses on the varied approaches to treating patients with pain, and frankly discusses the pros and cons of each type of treatment.”

The keynoter is Dr. David Hanscom of the Comprehensive Spine Program at Swedish Neuroscience Institute in Seattle.

Dr. Hanscom will speak on Treating Chronic Pain: A Whole Person Perspective.

The CDC Opioid Guideline will receive a lot of attention, as you might guess. Dr. Sanford Silverman will discuss it on Saturday.

A number of other issues, including medical marijuana, dealing with patients and even the pain that NFL players endure will be discussed.

By examining the latest controversies in pain management that affect providers, The 2016 Southern Pain Conference hopes to give practical, exportable solutions that can be immediately implemented in daily pain practice.

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Authored by: Ed Coghlan

There are 31 comments for this article
  1. Chuck at 11:40 pm

    This letter is worthy of many reposts.

    Julie Fannin
    September 29, 2016 at 1:13 pm
    I’ve lived with severe chronic pain since 1999 and due to a horribly botched (and I later discovered completely unnecessary) spine fusion I will live with this pain for the rest of my life. I have very little life to speak of actually as my dosage of pain medication has been reduced by 70% yet my conditions continue to get worse. I have too many pain issues in too many areas to fit everything into one category. My last surgeon for a reconstructive surgery told me flat out that I will be in extreme pain for the rest of my life, he was right. Add on top of this that I’m now caring for my disabled husband. I haven’t been able to sleep over 2 hours at a time due to pain in over 16 years! I’m exhausted!!! I am not a drug addict, I don’t drink (I don’t like to feel out of control) and my pain medication has no effect on me except to relieve a small amount of pain. Oh, and since my medication has been reduced so drastically I am no longer able to get any exercise and I’m starting to put on weight. To help get through each day I also take over 300 Aleve per month. I’m just waiting now for my kidneys to fail and I already know that my liver is enlarged, I’m waiting for it to fail also. There will come a day when I can no longer deal with this much (God forbid even more!) pain and I will indeed simply blow my brains out to get out of this hell. I literally have no life! Why stick around in such misery? So when you (those who make the decisions of quality of life) for us who have never experienced what we live with 24/7 365 days out of the year take away what little we have left be sure to make a separate column of statistics for those of us who took our own lives or died from the side effects such as renal & liver failure from OTC drugs, or a heart attack because our bodies are under so much stress from the pain. I know that someday my blood will be on your hands. Whatever happened to “First do no harm”?

  2. Chuck at 11:31 pm

    before I read the article I just want to answer the question posed. NO!

  3. Krissy at 8:06 pm

    Danny, I think that’a great and I hope there will be a turnout that is effective and helps all of us! I wrote a question about Medicare Rx pricing and did get this personal letter today. I believe there are many patients writing and we are all hoping for results. I’m glad to see your intent! I could not possibly go, but I will be very interested in the results. I’ve been fighting for a long time, in the interest of all pain patients. Personally I get the meds I need, but have a big interest in doing what I can.

    I thought I could upload the letterhead but can’t right now — too tired to see very well. If anyone wants it, just ask. It is not specific to pain meds but includes all.

    Dear Ms. Anderson:

    Thank you for contacting me regarding the recently announced Medicare Part B Payment Model proposal. I always appreciate hearing from constituents back home as it helps me better serve you in the 114th Congress.

    As you may know, on March 11, 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) announced a proposal to change how CMS pays for prescription drugs. The demo program that CMS has laid out consists of two phases, each of which will have significant impact on the drugs prescribed to our seniors. With this program, CMS is attempting to influence the drugs that physicians prescribe to patients.

    On April 29, I joined with nearly 200 of my colleagues in the House of Representatives in sending a letter to CMS asking them to withdraw the proposed demo. As of yet, CMS has not responded to our concerns about the effect this program would have on our seniors. We simply cannot allow this type of tampering with the health of seniors, many of whom depend upon Medicare Part B to pay for life-saving drugs. Rest assured that I will do everything in my power to ensure that benefits are preserved for our seniors.

    Again, thank you for contacting me. Please do not hesitate to do so in the future, should you have any other questions or concerns. I encourage you to sign up for my e-newsletter by visiting my website at http://www.mariodiazbalart.house.gov to receive regular updates. You can also follow me on Twitter @MarioDB or visit my Facebook page by searching for “Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart”.

    Sincerely,

    Mario Diaz-Balart
    Member of Congress

  4. Dave at 4:48 am

    @ Connie- Youve hit the nail on the head-for to long too many people in pain and there family were too passive about their care- and now we have an epidemic of carelessness. Health care providers werent troubled enough to do better for people in pain werent demanding them to do better and they werent demanding improvements in their care from government. So society was sleeping when it came t pain care,
    People in pain can and should do what they failed to do for so long- call for changes- call on government and call on providers. As people in pain are competing with other vooices for the attention of government and providers- they had better unite and work together on a vision and a plan.
    We have seen a very united bunch of kratom advocates make some progress wit the dea. People in pain are a very large group and have mre potential to be heard. Its time the millions of sheeple with pain realize passivity is not the answer to a better future. And so united and active peple in pain can make a better future.

  5. Danny Elliott at 7:03 pm

    I am going to try to do what I think is right. I certainly don’t expect anyone to agree with me.

  6. connie at 5:23 pm

    Just playing devils advocate of a moment.. what is the chance of the powers that be say that if we can travel and protest we can’t possibly be in the pain we claim? We know their thought processes leave a lot to be desired!

  7. Joan Hamm at 10:58 am

    I never ever got high from my pain meds from day one!!! The meds go right to the RSD part of the body… Eases the pain so I can live and function. The body knows somehow exactly where the meds are needed and do Help!!!! The maraghuana does not work… Makes one feel sick and immediately a headache!!! FYI. Only street drug I tried one time so if it helped my pain I could tell my Dr. It was horrible!!! I borrowed from a friend a few puffs… She took it from her son for me to try cause she wanted to help me get an answer so I can tell my Dr. I never took a street drug in my life or in my teens!!!!! The meds I am on works to ease the pain. The government needs scientists to come up with a pain pill that works for those of us who have nerve damage not a homogeneous mental and exercise treatment. You will be killing many people if you take away the meds that work!!! Then your suicides and 911 calls will go up fast if you interfere. Ketamine works but only if caught early!!! So face the facts… Many Dr’s and associates will be sued by taking away meds that kept us alive. Yes… I am angry!!! Been thru he–!!! To finally find what works. I was calling 911 often only to be abused because they saw no blood or a heart attack. On the ambulance they made me sit up tied to seat… I begged to lay down and a shot of oxygen… Due to the pain. They were all like devils… Treated me bad and ignored my request. I could hardly breathe from the pain. Then at the hospital I was yelled at by the female Dr. And she said to me go to your family MD!!!! I begged for her to check my numb t oes and where all the pain was. My face was red… Eyes red from pain.. Red blotches on my leg and baby toe navy blue on top and rear red on back of toe. Pain was showing on my body by these signs. Something really wrong and I clearly was suffering and she Dr. Kicked me out. True story from Delaware hospital.

  8. Danny Elliott at 10:20 am

    Krissy, it’s not about trying to meet with individual Senators and Congressmen. It’s about having hundreds or thousands of people attending the rally and showing that there are people who, despite severe pain, are willing to demonstrate how bad things have gotten for us. Those who are able to attend represent everybody who can’t, so the more people who show up, the more it’s a demonstration of the number of people who have so much to lose. Most “Rallies” or “Marches” in Washington, DC aren’t meant to meet with govt officials. It’s to make a statement, get news coverage and show how serious this issue is. I’ve written all of my state and federal representatives and have received a “form letter” in return, which shows that my letter didn’t mean anything to them. If I am physically able to attend, I will, because I don’t know what else we can do other than sit back and complain to each other, which accomplishes nothing. I’ve got to try to do this for me, knowing that I will have done EVERYTHING in my power to make a difference for all those who suffer like I do. That’s why I’m going to try to go. Wish you and everyone else would try, as well!

  9. Krissy at 9:12 am

    It’s on a weekend an no one’s in session. Do you think you will still get some action or press?
    I sure hope so, and glad to see you are going.

  10. Danny Elliott at 12:46 am

    Well, God willing, I’m going to Washington, DC on October 22nd to attend the “Rally against Pain”. My wife’s agreed to drive me and we’ll stay as long as I can. That’s something that can be done to let the bureaucrats in DC know that we do exist. I hope that anyone who might be able to attend will make every effort to do so.

  11. connie at 1:25 am

    Uniting is needed but how to do that when so many of us can barely read and reply to email is the question. Saying our loved ones need a step up in our place sounds good but personally ,even with a very large family of siblings,cousins etc I don’t have anyone who would walk across the street to help me in this fight! They are too busy with their own lives to even write an email. Of course there are also the ones who sadly agree with the powers that be. I fear that I am not alone in this. I do email or make calls when I am physically and emotionally able. So what is the real answer? I wish I knew! I will begin by voting against every incumbent I can! Sadly too many that are up for election don’t care any more than the rest of them.

  12. Dave at 5:15 pm

    Until people in pain and those who care about them unite- it wont matter to Ms Datz and her organizations what we feel, think say or do. They will pursue their organizational interests without regard to us. Its called the separate spheres doctrine- that they see themselves as separate from us and no law obligates them to hear our concerns. They are free to use the big lie technique to promotte biopsychosocial treamtnent- regardless of the lack of evidence and regardless of our preferences. Anything but breaking the law is permissible in our society.
    Note well how Ms Datz disnt ask us for suggesstions or to join their board or to meet with us…. How typical of professional organizations who wish to dominate instead of serve others.
    The answer is for people in pain to unite and call for more say in research and pain care-failing that the naive realism and financial interests of organizations of professionals will grow and the voice of people will continue to diminish.

  13. kym at 11:18 am

    Chronic pain patients are often stigmatized by pain physicians because we’re searching to improve our health so that we can function again. Many of us have suffered stunning losses due to chronic pain, our careers, financial stability, friends, family — what future do we have?

    Patient-warriors battling other life-altering diseases and conditions that are better understood are hailed as valiant, heroic, courageous. Not so for the chronic pain patient. We are barely acknowledged.

    Worse, these very medical professionals on whom we depend are unlikely to be our advocates. Or, compassionate.

    We are referred to pain management physicians by other doctors. And, so, those referring doctors defer to pain specialists. Whatever notes are in our charts are judgements, even if subjective and erroneous, we can’t shed.

    After running the gamut of doctors to get a referral to a pain specialist, God help the chronic pain patient whose journey or words are misconstrued as “red flags.” We are often seen suspiciously and often labeled as “complex”, “complicated” patients a vague bucket of medical deplorables.

    Pain specialists: please know that by the time we arrive in your office, we are in pain physically and also we are suffering emotionally from a sort of physician-PTSD. Many of us have endured previous negative doctor encounters, and now, we have to speak to you through the physical pain and the cognitive fear of NOT BEING HEARD, again.

    I understand that treating pain is frustrating. But, as a patient who has done everything pain specialists have suggested, the reality is devastating.

    Chronic pain patients are modern-day lepers. We deserve better treatment. Pain specialists, let it begin with you.

  14. Kristin at 10:52 pm

    No you are not doing anything right!
    For over ten years my life was going great. I was put on a dose of opiates that worked well for me. I did everything right. My records all reflect this. I was happy. I was active. Was my pain completely gone? No, but it was at least under enough control that I could do quite a bit.
    A month ago that all changed. I am now down to half of what I normally take. Simple tasks are now excruciating. I have written countless letters and made many phone calls. Pleading for help. It has not come. I can still walk my dog. But now he’s waiting for me to catch up. Every step is agony. As much as this hurts, this is the highlight of my day. Then I come back and go back on the couch or to bed. My limp is very prominent now and it hurts. I don’t want to leave the house anymore. Not like this. It hurts to do things that everyone takes for granted. Vacuuming, gone. Grocery shopping, gone etc. My life, gone.
    I am taking 16-20 Advil a day. Which really doesn’t help. When my pain meds are reduced further and I can no longer walk with my dog. My last 30 minutes of pleasure a day, which is getting shorter, slower and harder to do by the day. I think that will be it. I feel so trapped. There’s so much I want to do, but I can’t now. I don’t know what to do anymore. It seems nobody cares. I’m stuck at a pain clinic with a doctor who thinks mindfulness of my pain is all I need. I don’t even need to be tapered by Maine law until July 2017. And maybe not even then as the exceptions are not in place yet. It’s insane, but no pcp wants me after mine retired. Nobody wants a chronic pain case. I need help! I need a doctor who cares! I need a doctor who will look at my records and see I’ve done everything right. I don’t know how much longer I can live like this. I’m trying to hang tough and be strong, but it’s getting harder to do each day. All I can do is pray for a miracle. I just hope it’s in time.

  15. Louis Ogden at 11:36 am

    “The goal of the meeting is to reflect on the current state of pain treatment and to remind ourselves that we need to take a biopsychosocial approach to chronic pain and include all specialties,”

    I can understand the bio and some social aspects of treating pain; however, the psycho is BS. It does not matter if I think good thoughts, play quiet music, or any of these ‘think your way out of pain’ therapies are bogus, especially when one has been having pain for over 50 years. I have tried all types of therapies thru the years but NOTHING works like opioids.

  16. Sandy Miller at 11:19 am

    I understand all your posts and hope this meeting will help us. I feel like so many of you, I’m in pain 24/7 from a stroke in the thalamus, plus my back where I had surgery for Scoliosos. Now my new PCP says I shouoldn’t be taking Xanax and is going to send me to a pain clinic. Well, I have taken it for years and don’t take the amount prescribed, so I don’t understand all these people who have no idea what “PAIN” really is making decisions that will hurt us even more. Those addicts don’t need medication, but I’m sure they can get it if they want. For over 20 years I have had this stabbing, constant, horrific pain and I think all we can do is pray that The Great Physician above will come into the hearts of these people at this meeting. It took me 5 years to find these medications I take, and like so many others of you, it doesn’t completely take my pain away, but I do get some relief
    and I thank Gid for that. There are days when I still stay in bed because I’m afraid to take my medications the way I should and my neurologist is getting ready to retire, and as much as he tells me I need these meds for the rest of my life, and don’t send me to a painm clinic for medications, I have what I need whjich is not addicting, but apparenmtly my new PCP doesn ‘t care. I just don’t know what to do, my stomach is in knots and my hsuband has taken care of me since my stroke 15 years ago and he has health problems of his own (heart attack). I’ve had heart surgery too, so I have to take the medications and I say, “why fix it if it isn’t broke?” After years of trying dfferent medications, I finally get enough relief I can see my grandchildren, I can’t cook, or take them to the park, but at least I feel more like seeing my family. They are just taking away our lives. What kind of world are we living in now. It has changed so much. There is no cure for this condition I have either, and there are days now when I feel like this won’t even be living if they take our meds away.

  17. Danny Elliott at 10:12 am

    I’m really sorry about your experiences, MichaelL. I can’t imagine how you’re dealing with your pain, but I’m afraid it’s just a matter of time before all of us will be “walking in your shoes”. I do want to point out, however, that my Pain Mgt Specialist is a practicing physician “in the South”. And I’m extremely fortunate that he’s my doctor because he treats my pain aggressively, after many doctors used weaker meds that didn’t help me. That said, my current doctor is very strict about his drug testing, but if a patient proves to be honest and reliable, this doctor has their back. Will he continue practicing pain mgt? I hope and pray that he does. But, in this environment and the way things are headed, I wouldn’t be surprised if, one day, I’m told he’s quiting. And if that day comes, I’m done. I went through about 25 doctors during the first 12 years after my accident. Now that I’m 55 years old, I can’t endure that again, especially knowing that I will never find another doctor who will prescribe the meds I am getting now. And that will be it for me. I’ll be done.

  18. MichaelL at 10:56 pm

    Sadly, in my southern state, doctors are fearful of giving narcotics. The neurologist and the pain doctor, that I saw after moving back to the south with my wife, bragged that they had no neuropathy patients on narcotics! Doctors in this state prefer to keep their license and take no incentive to treating their patients compassionately. As a past certified pain doctor, I get nothing but substandard care, here in the south. I attended meetings with the Southern Pain Society and I was a member. They were very supportive. It had no influence and was of no help with the constant pursuit of the narco warriors in the state. Now, I barely control my nueropathy. Cannabis is reportedly helpful. But, the southern states are likely going to be some of the last to ever legalize, even medical cannabis. I have had responses in the recent past, from senators and congressmen that tell me in no way are they going to approve the use of medical cannabis. The preference, of the doctors and politicians, seeming to prefer to remain willfully ignorant in the use of cannabis in the treatment of chronic pain, only gives me more depression. I wonder if the doctors, that treat pain only care about the money. When we become difficult, they might even prefer that we become one of the death statistics. killing ourselves because they refuse to practice medicine as true practitioners, providing medical “care”! The pain doctor that cared for me, cared so much that he wrote Medicare (without telling me), to tell them I had exhausted all forms of therapy, and needed a dorsal column stimulator. Sadly, the only other therapy, that he offered me, was reducing my pain medicine. He did not consider the fact that I had a MRSA abscess after my spinal fusion surgery, requiring two additional procedures and six months of IV therapy through a PIC line. So much for caring! But, I am sure he is a member of the Southern Pain Society. I am almost proud that I no longer swim with the sharks! The practice of medicine is failing patients. They are appearing to be more self serving than, worrying more about how soon they can put an expensive device in a patient, making a huge surgical fee! It, certainly, helps in tarnishing the reputation of medical doctors!

  19. Krissy at 8:38 pm

    I would like to know specifically if the whole-body immune/inflammation/toxicity approach to pain treatment will be discussed and reported to the public. I believe in an integrative/functional approach to treating pain, and I see it as a direction in medical care that is moving fast. But we (patients) can’t afford it as it is now. The chiropractor down the street will be living in the multi-million dollar mansions while the traditional doctor loses patients (not his or her fault) because of a broken up “guided” system of “care.” But behind traditional (and often obsolete) practice is a new way to get to the core of pain. Disease in the body doesn’t start with an onset of RA, for example, but rather with what toxins and processes we’ve introduced that turn into RA because of disease. Why are so many Americans sicker than ever before, younger and younger? (Most don’t even know they are carrying toxic bacteria and fungus, inflammation and virus and they are going to get sick.) Why has the number of diseases and subsets of those risen to an epidemic level? Because we are what we eat, drink, do and breathe. If we don’t look at our pain from the standpoint of “why, when, how, where and what,” test our function and treat core problems, how are we expected to get well or even get a little better? For too many it’s too late. We are injured permanently. But for the rest of the population, I believe that the functional approach to medicine is what the future had better hold. With this, we need the government to get on board and get up to date if it continues to demand control, we need insurance to mimic the timing, and we need providers to be able to recognize disease before it gets out of hand. Why did the government just say they want control over supplements? The answer is so clear. As patients catch on to their (supplements) value and young people learn the right way to sustain in life, supplements will keep growing in popularity and availability over Rx medicine. While supplements can be expensive, most Rx prices are out of control, and they, too, are often made of toxic material. NSAIDS are toxins. Natural, organic medicine is needed just as much as organic food is, to help us get healthier. Now the government wants that piece of pie. Where does that leave those of us in pain if our doctors, insurances and research scientists aren’t right there with the knowledge of how to test for disease and prescribe healthy, organic supplements? I have researched and experimented personally, and I have reduced the kind of pain I have that is from inflammation. I cannot reverse degenerated bone enough in my case to go off of my opioids, but I have eliminated a lot of sickness by eliminating a lot of junk clogging up my organs. In doing so, I am less sick, I’ve lost 30 pounds in one month (and I am not overweight), I have cleaned up my diet so that I am not eating antibiotics, hormones, gluten (which resembles the thyroid gland where a ton of disease sits, having come from the gut), soy, chemicals of all kinds, and I have added ancient elements like turmeric, and simple fruits like lemon and berries, and vegetables that are healthy for me (the right vegetables are individual to the disease). So I ask again, are these attendees going to address what really needs to happen with medicine, in addition to keeping natural, organic prescription medicines, such as MMj and opiates available? I hope to hear something about this from the meeting.

  20. Dave at 3:20 pm

    Most of the comments so far reflect the trust deficit people in pain have toward the pain care system. this trust deficit didnt happen overnight and regretfully wont go away soon enough. This trust deficit was due largely to professional inadequacies including overconfidence, laziness, a paternalistic orientation, lack of independent, diverse or critical thinking by professionals, and a dismissive and disrespectful orientation toard people in pain.
    Ms Datz is morally wrong to suggest an interdisciplinary biopsychosial model is the answer to the shortcomings in pain care. First off this model is not in keeping with the preferences of many people in pain. It is unproven as few studies on few pain conditions have been done on her model. Furthermore it is irnic that Ms Datz believes an unproven model that often doesnt reflect the preferences of people in pain can be individualized. The interdisciplnary model adds to treatment burden and I am aware of no clear evidence that the blind men working on the elephant together is better then refering to one blind man.
    Lets say, for example someone with fibromyalgia comes in and says they want percocet, manaka acupuncture, and cbd oil loaded with triterpenes to help with their pain. I doubt Ms Datz could offer such individualized care. Ms Datz treatments lack scope sensitivty- she assumes a very small number of treatments in some combination will suffice for the great biosocial heterogeneity of people having pain.
    The pain professionals of today reflect what John Bonica wrote of pain care between 1800- 1960- no real conceptual progress. The interdisciplinary biopsychosocial model has been around for over 40 years and here we are with the trust deficit and issues like opioid access, patient engagement, medically unexplained symptoms, contentious illness like chronic lyme disease and me/cfs, inferiorization of people in pain, stigmatization of people in pain, unreliable urine drug tests, burdensome and costly pain care- to name a few of the unsolved issues in pain care. So its clear the swiss army knife called interdisciplinary biopsychosocial is not working s well. Its time to get rid of a moribund mdel and send it to the scholastic mortuary where it belongs and lets jump over the shadows in pain care and create the symbols of a new day.

  21. wendy at 1:47 pm

    May we – who believe in The Great Physician of any & all faiths – pray that everyone in attendance be convinced of the huge gap between dependence & addiction, so that we 24//7 chronic pain patients get the sincere caring & help we continually & so desperately seek.

  22. Julie Fannin at 1:13 pm

    I’ve lived with severe chronic pain since 1999 and due to a horribly botched (and I later discovered completely unnecessary) spine fusion I will live with this pain for the rest of my life. I have very little life to speak of actually as my dosage of pain medication has been reduced by 70% yet my conditions continue to get worse. I have too many pain issues in too many areas to fit everything into one category. My last surgeon for a reconstructive surgery told me flat out that I will be in extreme pain for the rest of my life, he was right. Add on top of this that I’m now caring for my disabled husband. I haven’t been able to sleep over 2 hours at a time due to pain in over 16 years! I’m exhausted!!! I am not a drug addict, I don’t drink (I don’t like to feel out of control) and my pain medication has no effect on me except to relieve a small amount of pain. Oh, and since my medication has been reduced so drastically I am no longer able to get any exercise and I’m starting to put on weight. To help get through each day I also take over 300 Aleve per month. I’m just waiting now for my kidneys to fail and I already know that my liver is enlarged, I’m waiting for it to fail also. There will come a day when I can no longer deal with this much (God forbid even more!) pain and I will indeed simply blow my brains out to get out of this hell. I literally have no life! Why stick around in such misery? So when you (those who make the decisions of quality of life) for us who have never experienced what we live with 24/7 365 days out of the year take away what little we have left be sure to make a separate column of statistics for those of us who took our own lives or died from the side effects such as renal & liver failure from OTC drugs, or a heart attack because our bodies are under so much stress from the pain. I know that someday my blood will be on your hands. Whatever happened to “First do no harm”?

  23. Toni at 9:57 am

    My pain doctor tailored a pain plan for me, it’s been 4 yrs on Kadian 60 mg. Twice a day, and I have never had to up my dosage. I use Norco for breakthrough pain, but I try to only use 1 a day. I have my life back. I work full time, it’s hard but I do. I’m so thankful for my pain management team and I hate that some people abuse pain meds and are making it hard on those of us that really need it for quality of life. I had to sign a huge contract saying I won’t use this or that ect. What a shame that a few bad apples have ruined it for honest people who really need the help.

  24. Joan Hamm at 8:58 am

    You will be killing people who have stabilized themselves from extreme pain if you reduce or take away medicines that work. The body is damaged to the point that no mind thinking therapy can possibly work.. Due to the disease and nerve physical damage done by an injury or a cancer. Pain medicines are the only thing that helps. Without medication these people will grow drastically in deaths. Calling 911 Every day… The heart can only take so much continuous pain. You will be causing many deaths. Go after drug dealers and bad doctors. Innocent people will die. If they are surviving on proper meds that work let those people live. Or is this your way of killing off people to make room for immigration?? People are wondering?? Everyone gets old.. Should be allowed to live as long as they can. Young people too. All should not die suffering in extreme pain but in peace with pain meds that work. Go after the high cost of medicines!!!! Do the right thing. God decides ones fate not your ideas.

  25. Dave at 7:00 am

    Most of what painspecialiats do is wrong from a treatment perspective a moral perspective and a denocratic perspective. In fact most of it is very wrong. They exclude the voice of people in pain and egregiously assume no one could possibly disagree with them or their beliefs. They suffer from an interminable case of hubris syndrome. And their hubris is remarkable given the few treatments they have bothered to learn.
    They lack motivational intensity and vision and they are morally disengaged. Their failure to call for synthesizing and sharing what has been used to treat pain reflects their ignoble desire to mmake pain care as easy and simple as possble. They havent used adaptive research or interventions. They are stuck on dated treatments and are opposed to cures for pain. They have not and will not try to create the syymbols of a new day for people in pain
    Yhey look down not only on input from people in pain but from the larger society. It is either there way or the highway. They fear counterpoint for that threatens their certaintism. They are antidemicratic autocrats who insulate themselves from the real world of people in pain.
    Pain specialists are very much part of the problem and remarkably autistic in their views and ineffectove in meeting the needs of people in pain.

  26. connie at 6:31 am

    How much would you like to bet that nothing good comes out of this conference for the chronic pain community?

  27. Danny Elliott at 6:21 am

    “(T)he dilemma that pain is the number one public health problem and opioids–which have been used to address chronic pain– cause a number of deaths, as something that must be addressed.”

    I just hope that, in addressing pain and the “number of deaths” caused by opioids, it is discussed in terms differentiating between people in pain who take their meds as directed and needed versus those who take opioids that are not specifically prescribed to them by a doctor and take opioids to get “high”.

    I don’t know the statistics, but I’m sure there is a huge discrepancy between these categories of opioid users. Also, I know from personal experience that a third category includes severe, intractable pain patients who use their prescribed meds to commit suicide because they can’t (or don’t want to) live with the pain anymore. That’s a category that I believe is not only misunderstood, but miscalculated, as well. My friend who chose this option never had an autopsy performed due to his family’s request. They either assumed that he simply passed away (from a non-life threatening condition, by the way) or chose to avoid the “embarrassment” of others knowing that he chose suicide.

    The entire chronic pain situation is complicated and can’t be dealt with using simple solutions. Broad, all-encompassing “guidelines” do not apply cannot be used. Chronic pain requires treatment on a case-by-case method between a doctor and the pain sufferers. Conferences like this one seem to result in all-encompassing recommendations or guidelines.

  28. susan at 5:18 am

    I am a Chronic pain patient. I am exhausted by all the pills, remedies, exercise, u name it, I’ve done it. A few years back I joined a study that tested long acting Hydrocodone that lasted almost all day..it was great..what happened to it? I know it takes a while to get approved, but it was like a miracle. And no I’m not an addict, I am back to using Advil because I’m constantly in pain and can’t keep going to the doctor.

  29. Mary Carrazza at 3:54 am

    Obviously not – or why hold a convention to ask if you are helping those with chronic pain!
    As there are no diease specific medications for fibromyalgia – the answer is an emphatic : NO.