Southwest Airlines raises $100,000 for NWRA

Southwest Airlines raises $100,000 for NWRA


Southwest Airlines raises $100,000 for NWRA

Southwest Airlines raises $100,000 for NWRA

The Help Us Help Them program by the National Wildlife Refuge Association started on September 21st, and ended on October 4th with $100,000 in the bank.For every Early Bird check in, Southwest Airlines promised to donate one dollar to the program. And they reached that goal in two weeks and six days.

What will the National Wildlife Refuge Association do with the money? Here are just a few examples:

  • Work on the Gulf Coast to protect pelicans, manatees, sea turtles, and a great many other species impacted by the oil spill will be benefited from Southwest’s commitment. This will be done by conservation easements and land acquisition.
  • The sea turtles will be able to nest on clean beaches, West Indian manatees will find warm water springs that have no oil and sea birds will be able to find clean nesting areas to raise their chicks.
  • Help restore beaches, marshlands and uplands that are extremely important for marine mammals, migratory birds, and a wide spectrum of shellfish. NWRA will also help with the cleanup of soiled habitats. This is just not important for all wildlife but also the economy of the Gulf Coast.
  • Rally decision-makers to increase the funds to restore the Gulf. Also, to give and provide support for our national wildlife refuges. Teach volunteers how to rally their national and local representatives to not give up on the Gulf.
  • Strengthen volunteering and organizations. Build grass root efforts, keep recovery efforts going by encouraging long-term cleanup efforts. This includes cleaning oil damage and residue, planting dune grass and monitoring species recovery.

These are cornerstones of wildlife conservation by the NWRA in the United States. This also provides destinations where people can enjoy viewing the birds and animals in their natural habitat without disturbing them.

Image via Wikipedia

Authored by: Cheri Youmans

Cheri Youmans writes for us. We wish her well.