Tips on How To Comment to the CDC on Opioid Guidelines

Tips on How To Comment to the CDC on Opioid Guidelines

When the Centers for Disease Control was pressured to open the public comment period on its controversial opioid guidelines, most saw it as a positive step in putting more transparency into the effort.

Numerous National Pain Report readers were discussing the best way to submit a comment to CDC. That prompted us to ask Terri Lewis PhD, who is an activist on health policy particularly as it applies to chronic pain the best way to comment to the CDC.

Her advice is take your time, keep your cool and be intelligent. As Dr. Lewis said, “They don’t want your life story.” Limit your comments to the equivalent of about 500-700 words tops or two hand or typewritten pages.

Dr. Lewis also recommends that you suggest friends and loved ones also comment.

Here’s more of her advice:

First, focus on yourself as a person

  • Identify who you are as a person, your roles as a spouse, parent, family member, member of your community.
  • Identify the reason you rely on medications of any type and if you are using alternatives to prescriptions (ACAM), identify that too (type of disability, duration of your injury or chronic pain)
  • Identify where you live and how chronic pain affects your ability to live, work, and play in your community
  • Tell them how many people are affected by your need for effective support for chronic pain

Share what works

  • Identify what your medication protocols allow you to do to continue to assume your personal and community roles.
  • Identify the practices that you think are helpful to others
  • Identify the local resources that you reply on – general medicine, pain management, mental health and counseling, addiction support programs, insurance, whatever
  • Share the practices that you use which are integrated into your prescribing protocol

Share what doesn’t work

  • If you have been helped or harmed by the national discussion and its’ effect on your access to effective health care services
  • If you have been harmed by lack of access or changes to health care, tell them how.
  • Identify the local resources that are not available to you – general medicine, pain management, mental health and counseling, addiction support programs, insurance support, whatever
  • Provide specific feedback about approaches that are not effective for you.
  • Have changes in the law made your access to appropriate care unavailable? Why?

Summary

  • Thank them for opening the door to submit comments from persons who are affected by chronic pain of all types.

What NOT To Do?

Be specific. Don’t –

  • Don’t Ask them why they hate you
  • Don’t Issue Threats or call them names (or curse)
  • Don’t Complain to them about your local physicians

————————————

You can comment online or write them a letter.

Here’s how you contact the CDC.

Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=CDC-2015-0112-0001 Follow the instructions for submitting comments (NOTE: “Comment Now” button in upper right corner of screen).

Mail:

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Attn: Docket CDC-2015-0112

4770 Buford Highway N.E., Mailstop F-63,

Atlanta, GA, 30341

All submissions received must include the agency name and Docket Number. All relevant comments received will be posted without change to http://regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. For access to the docket to read background documents or comments received, go to http://www.regulations.gov.

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Authored by: Ed Coghlan

There are 35 comments for this article
  1. dave rosen at 9:36 pm

    you can write to the CDC, DEA,CONGRESSMAN OR AND NEWSPAPER. LET THEM KNOW ABOUT THE MILLIONS LIKE YOU SUFFERING GOING UN OR UNDERTREATED AND JUNKIES ARE GETTING ALLL THE ATTENTION
    OUR SYSTEM IS A JOKE

  2. BL at 7:50 pm

    Tracie Carlson, where did you get the idea that you can’t drive and take Norco or other pain meds ? If you have side effects from any med that affects your ability to drive, you shouldn’t drive while you’re taking that med. But, there is no law that states you cannot drive if you’re taking these meds ? I am assuming your dr told you this ? Do you have a link to the law that states this ?

  3. VINCENT SCIOLI at 6:49 pm

    I guess I missed the deadline to post to the CDC.

    The posts I did read there seemed to be hysterical political opinions not from pain patients or pain doctors.

    I suffer severely every day and it is my natural right to seek relief in a way which agrees with me.

    I am tired of being treated poorly for the fact that Cannabis and Opiates work best with little to no negative effects for my conditions yet I’ve been forced to take numerous other drugs with terrible side effects and little or no pain relief due to corrupted politics and hysteria.

    I will not lose my mind or my digestion or my libido on these antidepressants and GABA drugs anymore.

    I will not hurt my self to please the self serving egos of the ignorant anymore.

    And I will not accept being put into a corner where my only choice would be to take illicit drugs either.

    I will have my rights and my dignity.

    I pray that those who make politics and profits of and from suffering come to compassion.

    And I pray that no children of the future will need to suffer excessively that liberty and justice shall redeem our institutions through understanding.

    THANK YOU AND GOD BLESS

  4. Tracie Carlson at 7:40 am

    I will make this as short as I can. I’m flaring terrible and in horrible pain. Spending hours getting ready for a new Dr appt. This will be a day I need my pain meds. I’ve been on Narco for 7 years. Prior to my Autoimmune diagnosis, I took Tramadol for 5 years due to a back injury from a car accident, never bumped up. I don’t get high, it takes the edge off my pain. I know the dangers of narcotics and take as little as I need. I’ve been driving on it for all these years. Now I can’t operate a vehicle??? I would much rather be on the road with “the edge off” than in pain, where I have a limited range of motion, and reaction time. This change has caused. More Dr trips,more phone calls, more stress,more money.more pain!! Let the Dr do there job, they know what patients are looking for meds. Maybe give the chronically ill a pass? I would think that would make it simple to pick out the drug addicts. I don’t deserve to be treated like an addict, and want the government out of my personal business. As to Pharmacists that make comments and hold pills beyond the date MY DR prescribed should be against the law. I’m struggling enough without this crap. It has only caused more pain and stress. It’s not good to be withdrawing more than taking the edge off. My health care is suppose to be between me and my DR. Heroin seems to be the choice of addicts, I don’t think making a registry is going to stop them. How about focusing on MENTAL HEALTH CARE!! That would help so many addicts, We don’t have room for them in hospitals so they end up in jail? None of this makes any sense. My caregivers are the ones that suffer along with me. I would like a life. Since this ridiculous change, all I have time for is bills and pills. The stress makes me sick and has destroyed my quality of life. This has caused all our Clinics to hire a huge amount of staff to track and deal with Insurance & prescriptions. Its costing Medicare twice as much!! Thank you for letting me have the freedom of speech this country was built on. I’m going to get my errands done,in horrible pain. I can take a pain med when I get back. By then my energy is zaapped from pain. I will be miserable when my care giver gets home. He deserves a life as well!!

  5. Angela at 3:53 pm

    First off, I would like to say that I am a Nurse, and work in home health where I see hundreds of chronic pain sufferers. I have seen a wide range of concerns with more intense guidelines, including physicians who will outright refuse to prescribe pain medications PERIOD, even to those people who have a long history of opiate use for a wide range of conditions that cause horrible pain and decreased quality of life. I have seen these pain sufferers go from an average of 6-7/10 pain daily up to a 9-10/10 and that is reflected in vital sign abnormalities, visual signs and symptoms of distress, and a HUGE increase in illegal substance use and abuse simply because the pain gets too great and they feel it is their only choice to get through the day. Where is the fairness in that? And I have seen some serious issues come out of abruptly stopping narcotics after long term use and have even see a suicide attempt because this person was overwhelmed with pain. The only thing I do not see, is the fact that the criminals are still able to access illegal narcotics and I have has a few patients of mine who were robbed because of their use. It is NOT hard to go on just about any street corner and find someone who knows where to obtain illegal narcotics, then the entire thing the government is trying to regulate is no longer regulated because people will go where they can get the medications. Take in mind, these patients have been managing their pain for alot of their lives with a limited amount of narcotics when we find the right combo that works for them, as well as under the amount that would be considered abuse. Yes, as a nurse, we count narcotics and check fill and refill dates as well as help to coordinate pain clinic and primary care appointments. We also try all other “alternative” means of lowering pain levels.

    On a personal note, I too am a pain sufferer and routinely have to take a low dose narcotic to manage my pain from multiple surgeries all stemming from an original broken back that my surgeon messed up. That will probably never change, and yes, I have done physical therapy, nsaid’s, laser therapy, heat, ice, you name it, but nothing else has allowed me to work and pretty much carry on fairly normal life that taking one or 2 narcotics a day allow. For one thing, I would not be able to keep up with my job and I would be just another “dependent” upon the government with disability, and yes I do qualify. Do I enjoy have to take them? of course not, and honestly, I have not met too many narcotic users who actually use them to have a more normal life who does enjoy having to be dependent upon them.

    The point being, limiting what people can get, if that is what works for them is wrong. Not every narcotic works for everyone and if one doesnt, it is time to change it up and find a different class or action that does. To not provide these medications to those that need them is only setting up this country for more illegal activity. Track it, manage it, and keep an eye on those md’s who are over prescribing. I do feel that they need to justify the need better before they can just give a prescription, but it should not be up to the government to say who can and cannot get a medication. You are not that person, and you have no right to say that they dont need it to live.

  6. LT at 8:12 pm

    @ Miki,
    I am also unable to post a comment on the CDC site, or even read the other public comments on their website.
    Either the website is poorly coded, and incompatible with some browsers, and/or security software, or is there is a deliberate attempt at blocking commentary? Anyone’s guess is as good as mine.

    This just seems like another poorly thought out and badly implemented policy, crafted by people with no actual experience in the lives of those who are forced to live with their decisions. I am seeing this more and more as a Civil Rights issue. I stumbled across this site looking for allies in the struggle, and ideas on coping strategies. At least it’s good to know I am not the only one recognizing the absurdity and unfairness of the whole situation.

    I am just another long term chronic pain patient trying to understand the increasing hostility, the accusatory behavior, and degrading treatment I have been experiencing by my formerly caring and compassionate physicians and nurses.

    (The Stanford prison experiment and the Milgram obedience study are the only logical explanations which seem to come to mind.)

  7. Richard A. Lawhern at 6:38 am

    The following is my submitted commentary on proposed US Government guidelines for the prescription of opioids to chronic pain patients.

    =================
    My wife is a chronic pain patient. I offer comment as a 20-year advocate for chronic neurological face pain patients. Over this time I have communicated with more than 10,000 people as a webmaster and researcher for online communities providing peer to peer mutual support and information sharing. I am a past member of the Board at the US Trigeminal Neuralgia Association, and a moderator at “Living With TN” in the Ben’s Friends communities for patients with rare medical disorders. I wrote and coordinated external validation of the Trigeminal Neuralgia fact sheet at NINDS. I also wrote most of the Wikipedia article on Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia. I have published commentary on related subjects at online venues including Psychiatric Times, Psychology Today, RxISK.com, About.com, and WebMD. I know whereof I speak.

    I urge a major reconsideration and restructuring of the working groups on the proposed 2016 Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. Chronic pain patients themselves need to be represented on these groups as voting members.

    In their present form, the draft Guidelines attempt to solve a real problem of prescription drug diversion, abuse and death by overdose. But I am convinced that they do so largely at the expense and endangerment of over 100 million chronic pain patients in the US alone.

    Opioid medications are not effective in all chronic pain patients. But for those in whom they work, these medications can make the difference between a manageable life with limitations, versus a spiral into death by suicide. In the past year I have communicated with literally hundreds of patients whose doctors are attempting to force them to relinquish the only medication assistance which has made their lives manageable. Chronic pain and major clinical depression are very often co-morbid. Though pain is never truly “psychogenic,” this association places patients at risk for self-harm when opioids are denied to people who desperately need pain management.

    If enforced in their draft form, the present guidelines may kill thousands of people. This does not have to be the case. Abuse and diversion of prescription medications can be detected and addressed. Although some chronic pain patients become dependent on opioids for alleviation of their pain, “dependency” is not the same medical entity as “addiction”, and does not entail the same behaviors. The great majority of chronic pain patients do not *want* to be on drugs, and are quite willing to cooperate with medical oversight on their use. The guidelines need to acknowledge and build upon this reality, while also taking steps to reduce diversion and abuse by recreational drug users.

    Sincerely,
    Richard A. Lawhern, Ph.D.
    Chronic Pain Patient Advocate

  8. Vanessa Harrison at 5:17 am

    One more time; I feel like I’m beating a dead horse. BL – I didn’t bring anything up about malpractice – I simply responded to a suggestion. As for doctors not giving out narcotics in the ER – that was something I didn’t know before moving. I had no problem in my previous state because they knew me and knew I was sick. Again – I will state that if a diabetic needed their meds they would not be denied. Do we need pain meds to live? Guess that depends on your definition of living.

    For a hospital to refuse treatment due to the nature of these medicines is the reason for these types of conversations. It’s insane.
    It’s also infuriating that people have been irresponsible and used these meds for purposes other than their intended use, and myself and others have to suffer the consequences; not only of having a hard time getting the medicine, but the treatment we receive being on it. It’s simply unfair. Luckily, I have a wonderful doctor now who is willing to help, and I am functioning again.

  9. Dorian W at 7:06 pm

    Bl
    you shouldnt judge anybodies pain. if she has had a doctor treat her in her old state then there is a problem. if that doctor is qualified ipaingt i dont know. a visit to the ER ISNT GOING TO GET YOU PAIN MEDS ANYMORE. IN REGARDS TO SUING A DOCTOR FOR MALPRACTICE, WHO KNOWS, NOBODY HAS TRIED. OT UNDER THESE CIRCUMSTANCES YET. IN THE MEAN TIME SHE IS NOT GETTING TREATED FOR HER PAIN, THATS THE PROBLEM. MY SUGGESTION IS TO CONTACT YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY AND GET A LIST OF PAIN MGT DOCTORS IN YOUR POLICY AND CALL THEM AND ASK IF THEY COULD HELP.

  10. BL at 6:30 pm

    Vanessa Harrison, ER’s have the right to refuse to treat. ER’s are for life serious, usually life and death emergencies. I’m sorry but what you describe doesn”t meet the criteria.

    Besides the fact that these types of suits dno’t raise ot the level of medical malpractice, if patients start suing drs for not prescribing pain meds, it will have the oppossite effect, no drs will be willing to prescribe pain meds, unless you are terminal and have been given only a short time to live or have had surgery. Patients cannot make drs treat them a certain way, prescribe certain meds, etc, that is reality.

  11. Vanessa Harrison at 4:18 pm

    BL – I think we’re getting a little off track. First, I don’t have the energy to file malpractice suits against all of the doctors who did me wrong; that list is long and plentiful. Second, Dorian wasn’t saying to sue a doctor for any reason other than refusing to treat me period. This happened in an ER. I was made to drive home – twice – after telling two different doctors at two different hospitals that I was too sick and in too much pain to drive home. They didn’t care. I was not asking for large amounts of opioids, nor have I ever. I take the recommended amount prescribed and I always have. I was with the same doctor for over a year and never had any problems. We are, I believe, all striving for the same thing – to be in as little pain as possible, feel well, and be functional.

  12. BL at 3:16 pm

    Dorian W, the standards of a community are cosidered in medical malpractice suits. Drs may errors in judgements everyday, that in not medical malpractice. The person has to have lost something like their ability to work for a long time frame or the rest of their life and the loss of wages has to be a huge amount, among other things. If a dr refuses to prescribe pain meds, you can go go another dr. You also must be reasonable in what you expect. If you want to sue a dr because he won’t prescribe you large doses of pain meds, that is not medical malpractice. If you don’t want o sign a pain contract or do drug screens, that is not medical malpractice. You can’t Successfully sue a dr because you don’t like what he did or didn’t do. You alsoneed to carefully read Everything that you sign when you see a new dr. Often you agree to being dismissed under certain circumstances or accept a dr not prescribing opiates as a condition for the dr seeing you. It is your choice to sign these papers, no one holds a gun to your head. If a dr tells you to lose weight and he will continue to prescribe your pain meds and you don’t do that, that is your responsibility, not the drs.

    If a dr not prescribing pain meds was a winnable medical malpractice suit, why haven’t countless drs been sued ?

  13. Dorian W at 10:04 am

    find a hungry attorney and sue every doctor that denied treatment. sonce you have had treatment for uears and havent been in trouble for anything having to do with opioids and have mris etc. you have a malpractice case
    the dr is knowingly doing harm to you that with treatment offered in the past made you a functional citizen. YOU HAVE A CASE! its time we fought back. of it were your child would you accept that!

  14. Vanessa Harrison at 9:26 am

    I am a chronic pain patient. I began pain management in 2012, and while these meds greatly improve my quality of life, the stigma, shame and judgment that comes with needing them causes me a great deal of anxiety and depression. I have been treated horribly by numerous doctors. I have three herniated disks in my back, DDD, arthritis in my neck, gastritis and chronic, severe migraines. I would give anything to be in good health and not have to rely on this kind of medication, which is so highly scrutinized. A person in need of insulin for diabetes would not be treated the way that pain patients are; they would be given their medication because they need it to function. But, because pain is “invisible” and there are people in this world that use opioids for fun, true pain patients continue to suffer. Upon moving back to NY from NC to be with family I was in search of a doctor who would simply continue the same treatment as my pain management doctor in NC; I brought all of my records, MRIs, x-rays, etc. It did not matter. I was forced into cold turkey withdrawal and left in pain because I could not find a doctor – until recently – to help me. I asked to be put in detox and was denied because I “am a pain patient and do not fit the criteria”. The things we, as true pain patients are put though is cruel and unnecessary. The pain we deal with physically on a daily basis is enough, for added distress to be placed on us emotionally is simply unacceptable, and it needs to change.

  15. bill at 11:23 pm

    bl
    that is not true. at least in CA. IF A PATIENT IS GRANDFATHERD IN SAY WITH 150O MG EQ. THEY ARE NOT CHANGING UNLESS YOUR A VET. DOCTORS ARE TRYING TO TELLING THEIR PATIENTS THIS IS IT. BUT THE PATIENTS THAT WONT ACCEPT THAT ANSWER ARE GETTING WHAT THEY HAVE IN THE PAST. THEY ARE TRYING TO BRING DOWN DOSES. IF PEOPLE ARE SAYING THEYRE OK AFTER THE REDUCTION, THEN THEY ARE OK. MY DR REDUCED ME FOR 1 MONTH. I TOLD HIM IT DIDNT WORK, IM TAKUNG THE BARW MINIMUM AS IT IS. ON THE DAYS I TAKE LESS MY PAIN IS A 9. AND I CANT FUNCTION
    THIS IS THE TRUTH THOUGH. IF I COULD FUNCTION ON 120 A DAY I WOULD BE THE FIRST TO REDUCE. People must petition the cdc and fda. STAND UP FOR THEM SELVES. OR ELSE THIS GOVT WILL PULL THE PUPPET STRINGS IN EVERY PART OF THEIR LIVES.

  16. Miki at 8:24 pm

    For some reason I can not comment on the comment section of the regulations.
    I don’t know if there is a problem with the website or if we are being stonewalled from commenting.

  17. BL at 3:12 pm

    There is an article today (Dec 29, 2015) in Medscape titled “Nonfatal Opioid Overdose No Bar to Further Prescriptions.” By Megan Brooks. I think the timing of this article is interesting. And I’m willing to bet that if the CDC Guidelines are changed, it will not be by much. It is also possible that the FDA could come out with a lower dose guideline.

  18. BL at 9:06 pm

    bill, Almost all pain management drs are going by the FDA Guidelines of 120 mg Morphine/120 mg Morphine Equivalent Daily Dosage that has been in effect for a while. So it makes sense that pain management drs as well as pcps and others will also follow the CDC Guidelines. FDA Guidelines nor CDC Guidelines are Law, but they are being followed like they are. Nothing has been said or will be done about the FDA Guidelines of 120 mg because if anyone was going to do something, they would have done it before now and they aren’t Law, just suggestions. It is up to each dr if he wants to go by them.

    Letting your dr know that you are up to date and informed is one thing. But if a patient gets rude about it or argues with their dr about it, they need to be prepared to be dismissed and not being able to find another dr that will manage their pain.

  19. bill at 5:19 pm

    Youe Dr has nothing to be afraid of. He is just playing you. He is a pain mgt dr. if you have proof of your pain, a contract with him, you dont dr shop or ask for early refills and are willing to take irin tests your ok. you just need to let him know. YOU ARE HIS PATIENT AND YOU DONT BREAK ANY RULES. YOUR MAIN IS DOES NOT GO AWAY WITHOUT THE MEDICINE.
    LET HIM KNOW YOUR ARE AFRAID OF DEPRESSION AND WHAT YOU ARE GOING THROUGH. HE SHOULD HELP YOU. UMFORTUMATELY THERE ARE TOO MANY JUNKEES OUT THERE THAT RUN OUT OF HEROIN SO THEY GO TO A PAIN DOCTOR OR AN ER FOR PAIN PILLS. IF A DR FILLS THAT KIND.OF PRESCRIPTION HE IS DOING WRONG. BECAUSE THATS WHEN THE JUNKEE TALES HALF THE BOTTLE AND OVERDOSES..
    O DO BELIEVE AT THIS STAGE WE NEED TO BE WILLING TO DO WHAT IT TAKES SO OUR DOCTORS FEEL WE ARE SUPPORTING THEM TOO. SAMPLES CONTRACTS MRIS OR X RAYS, A LOT OF BACK UP EX..LIKE ME, I WENT THRU PHYS THERAPLY FOR 2 MO THS UNTIL THE JERK MADE IT WORSE I WAS WILLING TO HAVE EPIDURALS. THEY DID NOT HELP, I WAS TOLD TO TRY SO MUCH SNAKEOIL STUFF. THE ONLY THING THAT ENABLES ME TO FUNCTION AND BRING MY PAIN LEVEL TO A 3 OR 4 IS THE high dose OPIOID MEDICATION. TAKE CARE

  20. Noelle ciancio at 11:49 am

    Bill- my doctor, who is a pain management doctor is just terrified of the new guidelines -I’m at a loss , living in pain everyday is no life. I just hope the cpc lifts these heavy regulations and scare tactics so I can be treated as a human .

  21. bill at 10:10 pm

    you need to let your dr know these guideline are far from official. let him k ow that you have done your home work and your pain is killing you! if he is a pcp you need to tell him to refer you to a pain mgt dr.
    The guidelines are not law. yu must step up and be more persuavive. tell him the 120 is not working. your calling in sick etc. you must let him k ow and make sure he documents the conversation
    There is going to be 1 hell of a lawsuit coming against PROP AND CERTAIN PEOPLE AT THE CDC.

  22. Noelle Ciancio at 4:14 pm

    I am a chronic pain patient with Rheumatoid arthritis, seid, connective tissue disorder , and multiple herniated discs. I hold a degree in business and I am raising 2 children. The quality of my life has declined since new changes in opiod laws have come into affect. My medication has been lowered 120mg due to the new laws. My previous prescription allowed me to work outside the home ,to enjoy my family and to have an equestrian hobby. Now however, I will probably have to apply for disability if enforcement of these new laws continue. I have been unable to walk, to get out of bed at all some days , and I’ve been missing work frequently. I am in constant pain every hour of every day . Living in pain everyday is not a quality of life , I can no longer enjoy horses, and it’s difficult on my marriage and my family life. The medication I take has never given me a “high” it simply helps with the pain .
    I am on supplements , I do yoga , I have tried acupuncture, behavioral therapy, breathing techniques , just about all suggestions from WebMD and anything I can read about what may help my conditions. Please consider those that are dealing with chronic pain when you consider the new opiod laws. The pain clinic I am a patient with regulates the medication . There are random calls for pill counts, urine and blood tests. If every chronic patient is regulated this way with their medication – there leaves no room for abuse or distributing the drugs elsewhere . Living in pain everyday it’s very difficult to have quality in my life. I thank you for your time and for giving those that truly need pain medication a chance to share their view.

  23. Carla Cheshire at 9:43 am

    Just to help: Write a rough draft in pencil on paper if you have to or type in a text program like MSWord on computer where you can edit, correct spelling, change things around. Once you have what you think is good, do a spell check. Then read it over start to finish. Sometimes the spell check doesn’t work, for example: words like for and from. It thinks they are spelled right but they are not the correct word for that spot. So read with this in mind. Do not write in ALL CAPS. It is very hard to read and it is considered to be shouting in computer protocol.

    I am pleased that finally we are given a chance to voice our concerns and help these policy people to understand what we are living with. It is extremely important to be a part of this process. It is very rare that a government asks its people for their opinion. Until I myself was faced with Chronic Pain I had no idea that it even existed, that it was possible to live with constant pain. Our disease is not well understood or publicized correctly. I also had breast cancer. With breast cancer people are so welcoming and try to be so helpful. It’s like you’re a part of a club and people can’t wait to be of assistance. I have not found that to be true with Chronic Pain. There is a lack of trust, of understanding and scornfulness is more likely the norm. The only way to combat this is to tell the truth.

    I’m going to get up, walk around a bit to calm my pain, then try to write my piece to the CDC. It may take me longer, several tries with time to rest but it may be the most important thing I do all year. Let’s do this!

  24. BL at 9:48 pm

    Please don’t use street names when referring to medications if you comment on these Proposed Guidelines.

  25. M.House at 2:13 pm

    TO ED COGHLAN:
    I KNOW ITS A LOT TO ASK. BUT CAN YOU AND TERRI LEWIS GO THRU THE COMMENTS POSTED RECENTLY AND PUT TOGETHER A LETTER TO THE EDITOR OF SE MAJOR NEWSPAPERS, LOCAL NEWS CHANNELS EVEN 60 MINUTES AS OUR VOICE. MAYBE SICNE YOU BOTH HAVE CREDENTIALS A COUPLE OF THEM WILL BITE AND TELL OUR SIDE OF THE STORY.
    THANK YOU
    M. HOUSE

  26. Scott michaels at 2:07 pm

    BL
    YOU ARE SO RIGHT. IM TAKE
    240 MG OXYCONTIN AND 60 MG MORPHENE DAILY FOR MY PAIN. I HAVE NEVER EVER BEEN HIGH IN THE LEAST BIT. ONCE MY DOC SAID TO TRY SOMA FORGET THE MORPHENE. I DID. I WAS OUT OF IT FOR 5 HOURS. I THRU THEM AWAY. HE THEN SUGGESTED THE VALIUM. NOT AS BAD AS SOMA, BUT NO WAY COULD I DRIVE. I COULD BARELY WALK. YOU HIT THE NAIL ON THE HEAD, OPIOIDS ON THEIR OWN taken as directed are fine!
    ITS THE MIXTURE, I KNOW IF I WOULD HAVE TALEN 2 SOMA NOT 1 AND THE MORPHENE. I PROBABLY WOULD HAVE OCERDOSED.
    BUT I AM NOT A DRUG ABUSER LOOKING FOR MIND ALTERING DRUG COCKTAIL.
    I WOULD BET MY HOUSE THAT 99.99 % OF THESE DEATHS ARE FROM MULTIPLE DRUGS TAKEN AT ONCE OR MIXED WITH ALCOHOL.
    AND THERE ARENT MORE THEN 50 ACTUAL PEOPLE THAT DIED FROM OPIOIDS WHEN TAKEN ALONE AS DIRECTED. FROM AND ALLERGY OR SUPER LOW TOLERANCE.

  27. BL at 1:00 pm

    Boby, no one has said anything about taking Soma off of the market. Most drs are extremely careful now when prescribing Soma and other meds like valium and xanax when you’re also taking opiates. This is due to the stats showing that those that have died were taking a combination of these meds. The CDC isn’t incharge of Prescription Drugs to begin with, it is the FDA. It is the FDA that issued the 120 mg Morphine/Morphine Equivalent Daily Guideline a while back.

  28. Boby at 10:26 am

    Attn: Docket CDC-2015-0112

    I was injured on the job in 2007. After surgery in 2008 I was forced into retirement fue to frequent absences. Since my failed surgery I am now a cronic pain patient. I was an active man in my community, but unfortunately cannot be any longer. I have watched the CDC change and remove medications for years now. I understand the pill mill situation, but that oroblem has been contained. Now it’s the true cronic pain patients that are having the problems. I take hydrocodone 10/325 4 times a day and Soma 350 as needed for breakthrough pain. Now I heard you want to take Soma off the market. When it works I don’t understand why you would do that. Now when you make your new rules. I will be at your mercy.

  29. Dianne Smith at 3:49 pm

    Attn: Docket CDC-2015-0112

    4770 Buford Highway N.E., Mailstop F-63,

    Atlanta, GA, 30341 I have had 9 back surgery’s been on pain meds for 17 years . I need my meds to have quality life. Dianne Smith.

  30. BL at 4:53 pm

    M, grammar and correct spelling are so important. When replying to posts here or typing an email mistakes aren’t looked at the way they are in Public Comments. One of the impairments I have is Rheumatoid Arthritis in my hands and nerve damage, so typing is often difficult and combine that with having a higher than usual pain day and no matter how careful I am, I make mistakes. But when typing something as important as these Public Comments I take the time to check, double check and triple check.

  31. Scott michaels at 10:25 am

    VERY TRUE..ACTUALLY FOR THOSE OUT THERE THAT ARE JUNKIES AND DRUG SEEKERS, WE DONT NEED YOUR HELP! PLEASE DONT WRITE IN, YOU PUT US IN THIS MESS IN THE 1ST PLACE.

  32. M at 7:18 am

    Spell check people… and if you don’t have good grammar or English is not your first language have someone look it over. Looks alot better to have something concise and readable instead of a good point sounding like meaningless rambling. No offense to anyone, but if we all write sounding messed up due to our emotions, medical situation, or grammar not being our best talent, they’re just gonna think we are all a bunch of incoherent junkies which is just what they want the public to think. Have a loved one help, then have the loved one submit their own comment. Peace.

  33. BL at 7:01 pm

    Don’t complain about things that aren’t the topic. In other words don’t complain about Norco being a Schedule II or that you have to submit to a drug test or sign a pain contract. Drug tests and pain contracts aren’t laws or guidelines anyway.

  34. Kim Miller at 11:06 am

    Excellent advice, Dr. Lewis. I know from working in the medical field, when complaints are received, not that anyone’s complaining, I stopped caring about the information the writer was trying to convey as soon as cussing, derogatory terms, or threatening language was involved. It’s human nature to shut down when all you hear is BLAH BLAH BLAH.

    Sticking to facts and trying to keep negative comments to a minimum will make your comments much more likely to be considered. Writing a comment is extremely important if you are interested in keeping your medications. It’s not often we get a second chance to right a wrong.

  35. Scott michaels at 6:50 am

    Great advice!
    dont let your emotions get the best of you.
    Please be sure to get as many people as possible to write in as well

    keep in mind, those against us are writting in also. these people might be hateful but they are not stupid.